Skills Acquisition Programme video


Skills Acquisition Programme video

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Decentric
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http://theworldgame.sbs.com.au/video/2209861830/Coaching-the-coaches


Above is a link posted to me from a significant entity within the FFA coaching hierarchy to explain the Skills Acquisition Programme. I'll be watching the SAP next week in this state.

The one thing that is useful in this video is that a lot of dribbling technique involves teaching the body swerve as a fundamental technique as a platform to teach more difficult techniques. The body swerve is the simplest way to wrong foot oppoenents. It is a basic technique where less can can malfunction under match pressure. If a player can do it on both sides of the body, there is an argument they don't need much else.

I'm not sure which city this is in, I'm assuming Melbourne or Sydney. Someone will recognise the background.

What surprises me is the calibre of players. In a girls rep team I coached a few years ago , who won a state title, but I've been told since at least half the team weren't good enough to even play at rep level, the few who were the better players could body swerve much better than the players in this FFA video with Han Berger and Alfred Galustian in it.

In the Skills Acquisition programme in the south of this state there were 67 applicants for the 12 years of age group. Only 20 were selected. I would have thought that the kids in the group in this video, would have been selected from maybe 400 players?

I'd be interested in Aussiesrus's assessment of these kids compared to what he has seen at ASA.

Or Gregory Parker's evaluation having coached elite teams.

Or Midfield Maestro's appraisal, who has a relative playing at underage elite level.

Or Arthur's assessment compared to the kids at his club.

Or Krones who has seen Queensland elite teams.

To me these kids aren't performing this technique as well as average players at FFES. The ball seems to be too far from the body, there is no change of pace from the fake to the outside of the foot dribble and the shoulder and hips don't move enough in the fake.

What do others think if you've seen elite kids at 12 -13 years old?

Also the adult coach demonstrating a double step over or body swerve and scoring a goal had the ball too close to his feet.

This is in no way designed to denigrate the FFA SAP programme. It is more to evaluate the calibre of players in this SAP.




Edited by Decentric: 17/3/2012 10:30:49 AM
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Decentric wrote:



Above is a link posted to me from a significant entity within the FFA coaching hierarchy to explain the Skills Acquisition Programme. I'll be watching the SAP next week in this state.

The one thing that is useful in this video is that a lot of dribbling technique involves teaching the body swerve as a fundamental technique as a platform to teach more difficult techniques. The body swerve is the simplest way to wrong foot oppoenents. It is a basic technique where less can can malfunction under match pressure. If a player can do it on both sides of the body, there is an argument they don't need much else.

D its mostly based on Coerver techniques. At Coerver today Alfred G was lamenting that there was supposed to be 20 Skill Acquisition Coaches now there is only 8.

Really they (FFA) should make the Coerver Coaching Certificate and Coerver Coaching Diploma a recognised coaching diploma/licence especially as it is a core component of the SAP program.

Most of what Alfred said on the SBS segment he said today, what the underlying tone of that segment and what Alfred said today is that the money available to maintain the program as originally intended and to increase the number SAP coaches and programs as originally envisaged has not available. Maybe Palmer is right we have a top heavey management expenditure.

Check out a coerver DVD before you watch the SAP session to better compare.



I'm not sure which city this is in, I'm assuming Melbourne or Sydney. Someone will recognise the background.

SYDNEY


In the Skills Acquisition programme in the south of this state there were 67 applicants for the 12 years of age group. Only 20 were selected. I would have thought that the kids in the group in this video, would have been selected from maybe 400 players?

Probably more. Last years Victorian SAP intake for Summer was taken from over 1,000 applicants.


Or Arthur's assessment compared to the kids at his club.

At our club we have had quite a few kids who have been selected for the SAP and skillaroos program.

We have had problems when kids haven't been turning up to it, rather attending our club's training and some who have rejected participation offers.

I don't think many more of our kids will be trialling unless they are committed to following through with the program. Overal the program is good but it has become elitist in Melbourne due to the numbers that want to do it. The sooner the FFA can expand it and accomadate more kids the better.


To me these kids aren't performing this technique as well as average players at FFES. The ball seems to be too far from the body, there is no change of pace from the fake to the outside of the foot dribble and the shoulder and hips don't move enough in the fake.

What do others think if you've seen elite kids at 12 -13 years old?

Also the adult coach demonstrating a double step over or body swerve and scoring a goal had the ball too close to his feet.

This is in no way designed to denigrate the FFA SAP programme. It is more to evaluate the calibre of players in this SAP.

Your a tough man D.




Edited by Decentric: 17/3/2012 10:30:49 AM


Edited by Arthur: 17/3/2012 09:58:01 PM
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I think coerver is a brilliant program.
Unfortunately i think elite teams are producing elites players and this is contrary to what football is all about.
I am sure that the ranks of the vic skills acquisitions program will be filled with the kids whos parents know people rather than the best potential players.

Does anyone have a problem with skilled players not taking the opportunity to go fast and hard with the ball when the opportunity presents itself rather than stopping to trick the opponent?

Another thing i have noticed is that players playing between the lines are not being identified as doing so unless seen by a foreign coach, is this happening else where?

I think before a coerver course is recognised a course on player identification should be undertaken by all selecting coaches. Too many times i am seeing players not selected or selected in my opinion for all the wrong reasons.


Edited by krones3: 18/3/2012 07:40:49 AM
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krones3 wrote:
Does anyone have a problem with skilled players not taking the opportunity to go fast and hard with the ball when the opportunity presents itself rather than stopping to trick the opponent?

Edited by krones3: 18/3/2012 07:40:49 AM


thats due to coaches over obsession with technique the 'how', but they forget the' when' and 'where' which can only be coached in a game related situation.
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dirkvanadidas wrote:
krones3 wrote:
Does anyone have a problem with skilled players not taking the opportunity to go fast and hard with the ball when the opportunity presents itself rather than stopping to trick the opponent?

Edited by krones3: 18/3/2012 07:40:49 AM


thats due to coaches over obsession with technique the 'how', but they forget the' when' and 'where' which can only be coached in a game related situation.

The skilled players would say they were waiting for support that did not come.
sometimes they would be correct.
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Decentric wrote:
http://theworldgame.sbs.com.au/video/2209861830/Coaching-the-coaches


Above is a link posted to me from a significant entity within the FFA coaching hierarchy to explain the Skills Acquisition Programme. I'll be watching the SAP next week in this state.

The one thing that is useful in this video is that a lot of dribbling technique involves teaching the body swerve as a fundamental technique as a platform to teach more difficult techniques. The body swerve is the simplest way to wrong foot oppoenents. It is a basic technique where less can can malfunction under match pressure. If a player can do it on both sides of the body, there is an argument they don't need much else.

I'm not sure which city this is in, I'm assuming Melbourne or Sydney. Someone will recognise the background.

What surprises me is the calibre of players. In a girls rep team I coached a few years ago , who won a state title, but I've been told since at least half the team weren't good enough to even play at rep level, the few who were the better players could body swerve much better than the players in this FFA video with Han Berger and Alfred Galustian in it.

In the Skills Acquisition programme in the south of this state there were 67 applicants for the 12 years of age group. Only 20 were selected. I would have thought that the kids in the group in this video, would have been selected from maybe 400 players?

I'd be interested in Aussiesrus's assessment of these kids compared to what he has seen at ASA.

Or Gregory Parker's evaluation having coached elite teams.

Or Midfield Maestro's appraisal, who has a relative playing at underage elite level.

Or Arthur's assessment compared to the kids at his club.

Or Krones who has seen Queensland elite teams.

To me these kids aren't performing this technique as well as average players at FFES. The ball seems to be too far from the body, there is no change of pace from the fake to the outside of the foot dribble and the shoulder and hips don't move enough in the fake.

What do others think if you've seen elite kids at 12 -13 years old?

Also the adult coach demonstrating a double step over or body swerve and scoring a goal had the ball too close to his feet.

This is in no way designed to denigrate the FFA SAP programme. It is more to evaluate the calibre of players in this SAP.




Edited by Decentric: 17/3/2012 10:30:49 AM


I watched the video i found it very imformative indeed, no doubt in my mind that 8 SAP Trainers isnt enough in a country like our selves, no doubt the program needs to expand further, Han Berger said that if the program was to make huge sigificance the program needs another 50 or 100 more trainers.

Im surprised why the FFA havent invested in this program further, im guessing Berger has got to the FFA's ear about this because the more kids get involved in a program like this the better the chance of better results?

The FFA must invest further in this no doubt, just dont know why they havent at this stage.
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Quote:
I watched the video i found it very imformative indeed, no doubt in my mind that 8 SAP Trainers isnt enough in a country like our selves, no doubt the program needs to expand further, Han Berger said that if the program was to make huge sigificance the program needs another 50 or 100 more trainers.

Im surprised why the FFA havent invested in this program further, im guessing Berger has got to the FFA's ear about this because the more kids get involved in a program like this the better the chance of better results?

The FFA must invest further in this no doubt, just dont know why they havent at this stage.

I think the reason is
1 it is not appreciated by everyone
2 it takes a special coach to coach it not any dad who grew up on NRL is going to be able to teach it and the lack of football people among the coaching ranks makes it hard to find suitable applicants.
With the lack of people who appreciate true skill over brawn the following article is of concern to Australia as well

http://www.itsroundanditswhite.co.uk/2012/02/27/can-the-waste-of-young-english-talent-be-prevented/



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krones3 wrote:
Quote:
I watched the video i found it very imformative indeed, no doubt in my mind that 8 SAP Trainers isnt enough in a country like our selves, no doubt the program needs to expand further, Han Berger said that if the program was to make huge sigificance the program needs another 50 or 100 more trainers.

Im surprised why the FFA havent invested in this program further, im guessing Berger has got to the FFA's ear about this because the more kids get involved in a program like this the better the chance of better results?

The FFA must invest further in this no doubt, just dont know why they havent at this stage.

I think the reason is
1 it is not appreciated by everyone
2 it takes a special coach to coach it not any dad who grew up on NRL is going to be able to teach it and the lack of football people among the coaching ranks makes it hard to find suitable applicants.
With the lack of people who appreciate true skill over brawn the following article is of concern to Australia as well

http://www.itsroundanditswhite.co.uk/2012/02/27/can-the-waste-of-young-english-talent-be-prevented/




I get your point but I have to disagree with you, thier are some great people doing some great work at he grassroots I.e working for academy's or small clubs etc but they don't get reconised for thier work, also thier alot of former pros good technicians who would do a great job especially here in NSW.

Just the FFA needs to invest more in this program because their are plenty of good people who dont get enough credit for what they do, the FFA need to give them a chance.

Edited by Barca4life: 18/3/2012 02:23:46 PM

Edited by Barca4life: 18/3/2012 02:24:42 PM
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I saw the SAP programme in operation last night.


The SAP programme imparted game sense much better than we do at FFES. The SAP coach kept asking players to think about decisions they made, or could make. The emphasis being on the player making sound decisions, not being told.

This is heuristic teaching, which I have done as a professional infant teacher in the classroom. In football coaching I must admit I am more didactic, telling players to do certain things, rather than discovering for themselves. One of the other very experienced FFES coaches , is good on creating the pre-conditions for fostering game sense.
I was very impressed with the game intelligence of the SAP players, supposedly the best in the state in that age group - ages 10, 11, 12.

20 were selected from 67 applicants.


What surprised me is the SAP coach said they didn't explicitly prescribe teaching football techniques. He only corrected them if they weren't working well.

The SAP players only touched the ball 420 times in 75 minutes. Yet they semed to touch the ball nearly all the time. In his defence, the SAP coach spoke about quality touches and touches.
Fair comment. I would say all of the SAP touches were in a game context and fitted his definition of quality touches.

The SAP rarely did any explicit intensive technique work, like the UEFA passing video, or 5 minutes juggling individually or in pairs, or the UEFA dribbling video, or the Barca Directional Control or Barca Control Pass. We do this at FFES and probably have players touching the ball 1600 times in 120 minutes. Still the last 60 minutes at FFES involves, players in soups (Arsenal drills), rondos and 4v4 and 1v1 SSGs.





Surprisingly, I think our FFES kids and the girls under 12 rep team I coached, have improved much quicker than the SAP kids, technically, but the SAP players make very sound decisions. SAP will produce very intelligent players, but probably lacking technique.

I can't believe that Alfred Galustian was at the SAP programme proffering Coerver advice, because I think what he is proposing would be anathema to the FFA SAP and FFA NC. Maybe they like his Coerver game skill drills, I don't know.

Having said this, the SAP session was the best I've seen in this state by some margin. I'm going to keep going on a weekly basis to learn more about the SAP focus on game sense. I learnt a great variation of a KNVB 4v4 SSG, to focus on dribbling. By making the pitch bigger there was more space for players to run into.

Also, the SAP coach thinks it is part of his role to educate other coaches.

Overall though, I like explicit techniques. I have had very prescriptive tennis coaching and learnt and taught karate every explicitly. I don't know where this non- explicit idea from in the NC?

It wasn't in the KNVB training I had. I was pulled up by Ad Derkson for leaning too far back when passing. I really like the explicit teaching in Brazilian Soccer Schools, but the techniques are often very advanced, and not often seen on the pitch in games. Nevertheless, the same BSS methodology can be used to acquire easier turning and dribbling techniques, like body swerves, and Matthews Cuts, which are reversed as excellent turning techniques.

















Edited by Decentric: 22/3/2012 05:42:27 PM
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Good decisions are based on philosophy of play.
I think the SAP should confine itself to skills not decision making.
JMO

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glad to see that berger (game related ) is getting his way over edwards (isolated technique )on the sap program.
Last year played against a team year older whose coach was so keen to tell me ha had 2 sap players, i only recognised them by their poor decision making .
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In the video at 20 sec 1 boy passes the ball to a kid who receives the ball standing still
Is this a good drill and is it what you want players of this level to do?
Concentrate on these things and leave decision making for other people.
JMO
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socceroos receiving the ball at 20 sec to 30 sec

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1mvlNK3aG8

Netherlands all players receiving the ball moving, wonder why?

BASIC FOOTBALL BUT THEN WHAT WOULD I KNOW-JMO


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cLvIXdm070&feature=related
this is football



Edited by krones3: 22/3/2012 10:15:23 PM

Edited by krones3: 22/3/2012 10:18:46 PM

Edited by krones3: 22/3/2012 10:37:51 PM
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I'll set out last night's SAP session. Age was 11-12.

Topic: Running with ball and changing direction.

20 players selected for SAP from 67 applicants


Exercise 1. Rondos in small 10m x10m grids, 3v1.

No specific instruction given to defensive stance/jockeying for the pig in middle. Players generally passed and moved in 1-3 touches. Neat triangles made. (52 Touches)

Rondos took about 8 minutes.


Exercise 2. There was a big circle about 40m diameter. In the middle was a 10m x 10m square. I can't mark it out here very well.

a. Players dribbled outside the square, but still within big circle. Coach called about half playing group in small square to do a change of direction and out again. The other half of playing group then went in as as soon as the first half went back out dribbling around inside circle in one direction.

Just instep used for ball carrying/running with ball.


b. Players then had to do a 'move' where they went in to small square and back out. Saw Cruyff Cuts, body swerves and Zidane 360 degrees turns. Players had to follow leaders.


c. Coach surprisingly showed all players change of pace move. I've never tried it, but we've all seen it on TV. Player dribbles along, then sole of the foot backwards on ball until it reaches instep, then forwards instep the ball. The player slows down, then speeds up again. Good change of pace. Well demonstrated by SAP coach. =d> All players tried it for about two minutes.


d. SAP coach suggests using both feet to dribble.

Exercise 2 takes about 10 minutes.
( 92 touches)
144 touches in total.



Exercise 3.

a.Similar to Coerver Skill Drill Six, by Alf Galustian in Performance, which I've used succesfully at FFES. Difference is that in SAP players they don't have explicit dribbling instructions or a range of suggested techniques to try, as well as keeping head up but looking down at the ball every third touch, in between trying specific moves such as BSS Ronaldos, body swerves, Matthews cuts, etc. that players try in between dribbling through goals.

Within a 25m x 25m grid there are lots of one metre goals. Players have to dribble through each one metre goal and change direction back through the same metre goal. Again no explicit specific turning technique. I'll definitely be adding this to my repertoire, except working on specific change of direction techniques.

b. At each corner of 25m x 25m grid (two so three are 10 players in each grid) there are 2-3 players. Inside the 25m x2 5m grid is the same small 10m x 10m square. Player leave corners one at a time dribble around a number of cones and back to partner at corner of grid. They pass the ball to partner about 5 metres away. Partner waiting does no stationary techniques whilst waiting, albeit not waiting for long.

c. Player then dribbles into square and plays against 2 defenders put in middle 10m x 10m square.

d. Players dribble in from corners of big 25m x 25 m square. In the middle square is one tagger. Whoever he catches, he changes places with. At last SAP coach asks stationary players to do statioirany ball techniques like we do at FFES whilst waiting.:roll:

Exercise 3 takes about 15 mins.

Now up to 330 touches in total.




Exercise 4

This is a 4v4 dribbling SSG.

SSG KNVB game 4v4. In the grid I've used, it is a square about 15m x 15m, so tight dribbling has been the focus.

SAP coach uses 4v4, but has a spare, so plays 5v4.

I question why not use the extra parson as a fickle payer (an extra for both sides when in possession?) SAP coach just hadn't though of it.

A goal is scored by players dribbling over their goal line and putting sole of foot on ball to stop it. Players should make good decisions. In this bigger grid there is more opportunity for players to carry the ball for some distance than when I've used the smaller 15m x 15m grid. Players can still pass, but to players with most space in front of them.

Emphasis is on ball carrying over distance and good decisions. This to me was the highlight of the session. Good coaching SAP coach.=d>

I'll be using Exercise 4 exactly as SAP coach used on the training track.:)

Session finishes after 75 minutes 420 -440 touches per player.






Good points of this SAP session.

1. SAP coach changed activities fairly regularly, every few minutes, so players didn't get bored with anything. From my professional infant teaching background, this is excellent behaviour management by SAP coach.=d>

2.We certainly have youth/juniors doing more repetitive techniques/drills at FFES. Players may enjoy SAP programme more, except for the massive amount of time spent playing round robin 4v4s and 5v5s.

3. Kids were engaged almost the whole time.

4. The kids were always touching the ball.

5. All exercises were game related.

6. Kids seemed to enjoy the session, much more than almost any other adults/youth/juniors I've seen coached here.

7. Coach very enthusiastic and passionate about the game. Good manner with kids.

I certainly complimented him on these points.





Causes for Concern

1. No defensive postioning instructions for defensive players in rondos. Should have been side on in the balanced jockeying position. Quickly closing down players, then get low, then tackle or force turnover.

2. Massive issue about explicit instruction (I'll revisit this later). SAP players had all sorts of techniques they've learnt themselves for quick changes of direction - some better than others.
FFES would teach standard Cut, inside of the foot change of direction cut (body swerve), Cruyff cut, the reverse step over cut for changing direction - in that order.
Who teaches these players if SAP doesn't and if kids don't know them? Certainly not many of the poor parent coaches who know nothing about football doing their bit.

3. There is supposed to me a mandated minimum of 600 touches per session. After SAP coach kindly told me everything he thought I neded to know, and I was appreciative, I posed some questions for him. How could he have increased the number of touches within same time session? SAP coach alluded to quality touches ad touches. Fair comment, but they should still accrue 600.

I think SAP coach warm ups should always start with juggling and a few hundred passes at very short distance, and Barca Directional Control. He should always have any player waiting in line doing stationary ball techniques. He could have 400 touches in 15 minutes.



I questioned lack of explicit instruction in Exercise 2. SAP coach thinks, " It is too complicated for players to remember I suggest doing everything very slowly, like in music, tennis, karate, that I've had a lot of experience in.


I also questioned the lack of explicit instruction in defensive body shape? SAP coach, "Again too much to remember for players".


I also questioned lack of explicit intruction for slow ball carrying and sprint ball carying like Everton Academy does. Again same response, "Too much to process".

Also, a common response was that players would not work on a technique, "If it was not in the age appropriate Building Blocks in the FFA NC".

I countered that in as in teaching some learn much quicker and slower than the norm. The slower ones need reinforcement and the better ones need to be challenged.

SAP coach also pays close attention to FFA NC Buidling Blocks recommended practice all the time. It is good to have a guide, but the KNVB was nowhere near as prescriptive.
I counter and say I use it as a guideline, but pay more attention to KNVB, taking every player from where they specifically are in their individual technical development.
Some kids will be learning to pass accurately with just the inside of the foot over 2-3 metres, whilst others will be using outside of both feet and instep on both feet, and with increasing range, also moving backward and forwards, as we have mixed ages and ability groups.








SAP has a theme for each weekly sessions, eg dribbling, running with ball, shooting, passing. FFES tries to do most of it at every practice session.

I'll cetainly be going back on a weekly basis when I can to SAP to absorb the SAP players' superb game sense and vision to learn a lot more.
The technique issue has created a lot of reappraisal on my part, but I think they are really going down the wrong path. It contradicts KNVB as I understand it, Coerver, UEFA Training Ground (sent to me by a pro coach overseas), AC MIlan Academy, Barca Academy, Everton Academy, Man City Academy, Brazilian Soccer Schools and when I've see the Matildas take coaching sessions a few years ago.

In two sessions a week the SAP players touch the ball a lot less than our FFES players do in one session a week.



I was told by the state FFA TD that Alistair Edwards, either by himself, or with one or two others, was charged with deciding on what was world's best practice from visiting KNVB, Clarefontaine, Japan and the USA.



































Edited by Decentric: 23/3/2012 12:14:18 PM
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Causes for Concern

1. No defensive postioning instructions for defensive players in rondos. Should have been side on in the balanced jockeying position. Quickly closing down players, then get low, then tackle or force turnover


only coach one topic at a time, the session was Running with ball and changing direction

also running with the ball should use outside of the foot
dirk vanadidas
dirk vanadidas
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2. Massive issue about explicit instruction (I'll revisit this later). SAP players had all sorts of techniques they've learnt thenselves for quick changes of direction - some better than others.
FFES would teach standard Cut, inside of the foot change of direction cut, Cruyff cut, the reverse step over cut for changing direction - in that order.
Who teaches these players if SAP doesn't and if kids don't know them? Certainly not many of the poor parent coaches who know nothing about football doing their bit.

peer coaching, you will be surprised outside of your training what kids will want to do becoz of their peers are doing the moves, a player that loves the game will do these moves in their own time.


Decentric
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dirkvanadidas wrote:
Causes for Concern

1. No defensive postioning instructions for defensive players in rondos. Should have been side on in the balanced jockeying position. Quickly closing down players, then get low, then tackle or force turnover


only coach one topic at a time, the session was Running with ball and changing direction

also running with the ball should use outside of the foot



Running with ball is almost low instep, outer side of foot area close to toes.

I've also heard only coach one topic at a time before. It is a valid point. The counter argument is maximum usage of time on the training ground.

Edited by Decentric: 23/3/2012 12:21:09 PM
Davo1985
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Massive bump I know but was searching online and couldn't find the date when SAP was introduced. Anyone know the actual year??

Also does anyone know when small sided games was introduced?
Barca4Life
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Davo1985 wrote:
Massive bump I know but was searching online and couldn't find the date when SAP was introduced. Anyone know the actual year??

Also does anyone know when small sided games was introduced?


Im not 100% but coming from NSW but i think SSGs was introduced in 2008 but then again in a national sense maybe 2009?

But with SAP it came in NSW with the Project 22 scheme in 2010 which only lasted 2 years, Skillaroos was probably in 2011 and i recall SAP went to all clubs in 2013.

Not sure about the states though.
juniorcoach
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Can someone from NSW fill us in on how the Small sided Football for under 12s is running this year?
Is it box to box or across ground? Are parents reffing the games or is a ref allocated. Any other feedback would be great.
Cheers
GO


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