2016 FFA State Conferences


2016 FFA State Conferences

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Decentric
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krones3 wrote:
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Another example was I think Ian Ferguson failed his A Licence. Yet he coached Glory who were about to play in the FFA Grand Final under his tutelage.

Did he eventually get one?


He must have.

Otherwise FFA would have had to sack him at the same time as he was leading Glory into a Grand Final in the HAL.:lol:

There are some real inconsistencies the ways coaches have been assessed in courses by FFA in the past. I think there were some cases of revenge.

Someone on here said that in Brisbane the assessor had failed all candidates in a B Licence course. In education, the upper echelons of the bureaucracy would have a good, long hard look at the quality of the assessor. It would be deduced that his/her ability to convey the message was totally inadequate.

What has happened is that some of the many coaches who have been failed have not been able to do the next level of courses.

Then FFA have not been able to run some coach education courses , due to insufficient numbers of qualified candidates. The perpetrators, possibly the likes of whoever failed Fergie (possibly through an act of payback or revenge), have then not been able to run higher level courses that follow on.

Under Erik Abams tenure, FFA realises we only have one trained C Licence coach in Oz for every 50 in Japan.

A point I've made in a big FFA conference is that there is at times far too much prestige afforded to some of the Advanced licences which are very, very low calibre qualifications, quantitatively and qualitatively, compared to tertiary degrees and subsequent postgraduate diplomas. Those in the FFA system, or pro clubs, with sports science, economics, accounting or education qualifications can see the point.

Conversely, in Japan and in the Middle east, there is a culture where nobody ever fails in coach education. We are all in the same AFC too.

Edited by Decentric: 16/2/2016 12:29:06 AM
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One other massive change is recognition by FFA that they need to identify talent for elite pathways much better than they do.

The state TD asked any of us to keep any player in mind with talent who may not have been appraised in that he be contacted for someone to run an eye over a mooted player.


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On e of the concepts that stands out is that in the Whole Of Football Plan is Ange's influence. It has already been mentioned before, but Ange dislikes the current concept of 24 AIS players.

He emphatically wants 3000 players being afforded similar opportunities across the country.

There will also be specialised girl academies.

Ironically, Ange's job was on the line before the Asian Cup. I still have trouble with the concept of national team senior coach and TD role being fused.
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theFOOTBALLlover wrote:



I think the presentation just echoed certain things I learnt in the C Licence. The importance of analysing opponents and analysing performances by filming games helped the players learn how to adapt and play against different styles and visually see what they are doing well/wrong. Sometimes players need to see it to believe it.



Certainly didn't learn the value of video analysis in the C Licence course I did.

The five Ws were pushed.

I also did some excellent analysis with the KNVB, which was very analytical and comprehensive.

The thrust was being able to analyse effectively on match day, then to plan a training program the following week to rectify problems identified from the game.

With video analysis though it is useful to show some players where they need to improve. Some boys in particular, think they are a lot better than they are and that they know a lot more than they do at ages 13-16.
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Decentric wrote:
theFOOTBALLlover wrote:



I think the presentation just echoed certain things I learnt in the C Licence. The importance of analysing opponents and analysing performances by filming games helped the players learn how to adapt and play against different styles and visually see what they are doing well/wrong. Sometimes players need to see it to believe it.



Certainly didn't learn the value of video analysis in the C Licence course I did.

The five Ws were pushed.

I also did some excellent analysis with the KNVB, which was very analytical and comprehensive.

The thrust was being able to analyse effectively on match day, then to plan a training program the following week to rectify problems identified from the game.

With video analysis though it is useful to show some players where they need to improve. Some boys in particular, think they are a lot better than they are and that they know a lot more than they do at ages 13-16.


The C Licence asked to analyse a Australia vs Brazil (youth) and create sessions based on the football problems presented in the game. Some people might not have thought too much about it but I started to apply it to my coaching.

Since the course, I've used the footage of games in the past two seasons to demonstrate to the team what we were doing right/wrong both as a team and individuals. Every week, I'd demonstrate with the footage as evidence what our football problem was. This is very time consuming though - it took me about 3 hours to watch a 90 minute game before training on Tuesday.

Did you have to go to Europe for the KVNB course? I'd really love to do a course on periodisation - I hope they have a lot of information on it in the B licence.

Edited by theFOOTBALLlover: 16/2/2016 09:20:43 AM
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Decentric wrote:
On e of the concepts that stands out is that in the Whole Of Football Plan is Ange's influence. It has already been mentioned before, but Ange dislikes the current concept of 24 AIS players.

He emphatically wants 3000 players being afforded similar opportunities across the country.

There will also be specialised girl academies.

Ironically, Ange's job was on the line before the Asian Cup. I still have trouble with the concept of national team senior coach and TD role being fused.


Did Ange actually say this i thought Eric Abrams was the one pushing the idea?
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theFOOTBALLlover wrote:
Decentric wrote:



Certainly didn't learn the value of video analysis in the C Licence course I did.

The five Ws were pushed.

I also did some excellent analysis with the KNVB, which was very analytical and comprehensive.

The thrust was being able to analyse effectively on match day, then to plan a training program the following week to rectify problems identified from the game.

With video analysis though it is useful to show some players where they need to improve. Some boys in particular, think they are a lot better than they are and that they know a lot more than they do at ages 13-16.


The C Licence asked to analyse a Australia vs Brazil (youth) and create sessions based on the football problems presented in the game. Some people might not have thought too much about it but I started to apply it to my coaching.

Since the course, I've used the footage of games in the past two seasons to demonstrate to the team what we were doing right/wrong both as a team and individuals. Every week, I'd demonstrate with the footage as evidence what our football problem was. This is very time consuming though - it took me about 3 hours to watch a 90 minute game before training on Tuesday.

Did you have to go to Europe for the KVNB course? I'd really love to do a course on periodisation - I hope they have a lot of information on it in the B licence.

Edited by theFOOTBALLlover: 16/2/2016 09:20:43 AM


It is really good to hear the benefits you have gained. You are also doing some great work, although very time consuming with your team/s.

The KNVB training was brilliant. I knew very little before I did the course. It was so good, an under 12 team I coached won a state title straight after , coaching against some very experienced FFA staff coaches.

Now it seems insignificant as development coaching is about development , not results. The main benefits were team structure, defensive organisation, comprehensive match analysis, four phase training ground method ( similar to the FFA C Licence) and coaching aspects of technique, although the FFA NC has added to it.

About half of it was expanded on in the C Licence. The other half of the KNVB course content was untouched in the C Licence. However, with recent FFA Skills Certificate, I think most of the ground is now covered by FFA.

Also, the KNVB has who been shown as not developing good enough players in the last 10 years or so. Most of Holland's best players are close too 30. From what I hear, if one is bothered about from overseas coach education , going to Barca would be best.

The Dutch are about to revamp their curriculum borrowing from the Spanish, Dutch and Germans, who have imported a lot of KNVB methodology in the last 15 years, but added to it.
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Decentric wrote:
On e of the concepts that stands out is that in the Whole Of Football Plan is Ange's influence. It has already been mentioned before, but Ange dislikes the current concept of 24 AIS players.

He emphatically wants 3000 players being afforded similar opportunities across the country.

There will also be specialised girl academies.

Ironically, Ange's job was on the line before the Asian Cup. I still have trouble with the concept of national team senior coach and TD role being fused.


The only way to do it is for the FFA or the state bodies to appoint TD's for each individual club in the top tier (at a minimum). If you have someone who knows what they are doing at the top of each club influencing/educating 7 coaches (13's to first grade) and the SAP coaches you will see fantastic progress in player development.

7 coaches x 12 teams (most NPL competitions have 12 teams) = 84 coaches, 84 coaches x 8 NPL's = 672 coaches working under the FFA curriculum. Each squad will have about 16 players. 672 coaches x 16 players = 10 752 players being coached according to the FFA curriculum. That's just the top tier of the NPL. NSW alone has NPL 1, 2 and 3.
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Barca4Life wrote:
Decentric wrote:
On e of the concepts that stands out is that in the Whole Of Football Plan is Ange's influence. It has already been mentioned before, but Ange dislikes the current concept of 24 AIS players.

He emphatically wants 3000 players being afforded similar opportunities across the country.

There will also be specialised girl academies.

Ironically, Ange's job was on the line before the Asian Cup. I still have trouble with the concept of national team senior coach and TD role being fused.


Did Ange actually say this i thought Eric Abrams was the one pushing the idea?


It could be both.

I know Ange doesn't like selection trials, not wanting to exclude players.
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Decentric wrote:
theFOOTBALLlover wrote:
Decentric wrote:



Certainly didn't learn the value of video analysis in the C Licence course I did.

The five Ws were pushed.

I also did some excellent analysis with the KNVB, which was very analytical and comprehensive.

The thrust was being able to analyse effectively on match day, then to plan a training program the following week to rectify problems identified from the game.

With video analysis though it is useful to show some players where they need to improve. Some boys in particular, think they are a lot better than they are and that they know a lot more than they do at ages 13-16.


The C Licence asked to analyse a Australia vs Brazil (youth) and create sessions based on the football problems presented in the game. Some people might not have thought too much about it but I started to apply it to my coaching.

Since the course, I've used the footage of games in the past two seasons to demonstrate to the team what we were doing right/wrong both as a team and individuals. Every week, I'd demonstrate with the footage as evidence what our football problem was. This is very time consuming though - it took me about 3 hours to watch a 90 minute game before training on Tuesday.

Did you have to go to Europe for the KVNB course? I'd really love to do a course on periodisation - I hope they have a lot of information on it in the B licence.

Edited by theFOOTBALLlover: 16/2/2016 09:20:43 AM


It is really good to hear the benefits you have gained. You are also doing some great work, although very time consuming with your team/s.

The KNVB training was brilliant. I knew very little before I did the course. It was so good, an under 12 team I coached won a state title straight after , coaching against some very experienced FFA staff coaches.

Now it seems insignificant as development coaching is about development , not results. The main benefits were team structure, defensive organisation, comprehensive match analysis, four phase training ground method ( similar to the FFA C Licence) and coaching aspects of technique, although the FFA NC has added to it.

About half of it was expanded on in the C Licence. The other half of the KNVB course content was untouched in the C Licence. However, with recent FFA Skills Certificate, I think most of the ground is now covered by FFA.

Also, the KNVB has who been shown as not developing good enough players in the last 10 years or so. Most of Holland's best players are close too 30. From what I hear, if one is bothered about from overseas coach education , going to Barca would be best.

The Dutch are about to revamp their curriculum borrowing from the Spanish, Dutch and Germans, who have imported a lot of KNVB methodology in the last 15 years, but added to it.


That sounds like a great course. I'm always looking to learn. I read a lot of football books. Would you recommend any courses or books? You seem to be well informed on coach education.
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theFOOTBALLlover wrote:
Decentric wrote:
On e of the concepts that stands out is that in the Whole Of Football Plan is Ange's influence. It has already been mentioned before, but Ange dislikes the current concept of 24 AIS players.

He emphatically wants 3000 players being afforded similar opportunities across the country.

There will also be specialised girl academies.

Ironically, Ange's job was on the line before the Asian Cup. I still have trouble with the concept of national team senior coach and TD role being fused.


The only way to do it is for the FFA or the state bodies to appoint TD's for each individual club in the top tier (at a minimum). If you have someone who knows what they are doing at the top of each club influencing/educating 7 coaches (13's to first grade) and the SAP coaches you will see fantastic progress in player development.

7 coaches x 12 teams (most NPL competitions have 12 teams) = 84 coaches, 84 coaches x 8 NPL's = 672 coaches working under the FFA curriculum. Each squad will have about 16 players. 672 coaches x 16 players = 10 752 players being coached according to the FFA curriculum. That's just the top tier of the NPL. NSW alone has NPL 1, 2 and 3.


It works more effectively here for the Football Fed Tas TD to liaise with clubs. There are only 8 NPL clubs statewide.

When I was a NPL TD there was considerable animosity even towards getting FFT staff coaches into some NPL clubs in a mentoring role. Some weren't that interested either, but the staff coaches of FFA 's job description has changed immeasurably under Abrams, Casserley, Ange, and in our case our state CEO, Mike Palmer
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theFOOTBALLlover wrote:


That sounds like a great course. I'm always looking to learn. I read a lot of football books. Would you recommend any courses or books? You seem to be well informed on coach education.


Highly recommend "How simple can it be?" and "The original guide to football periodization".

There are a bit pricey but excellent if you have bought into the FFA's philosophy.

https://webshop.worldfootballacademy.com/

The "Football Theory" book on the site is new and to me is a bit light on volume wise for the price. If you do get it, would be very interested in your views.

Also "The Coaching Philosophies of Louis van Gaal and the Ajax Coaches" is dirt cheap on Kindle via Amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/Coaching-Philosophies-Louis-Gaal-Coaches/dp/1890946036/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1455592313&sr=8-2&keywords=van+gaal

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biscuitman1871 wrote:
theFOOTBALLlover wrote:


That sounds like a great course. I'm always looking to learn. I read a lot of football books. Would you recommend any courses or books? You seem to be well informed on coach education.


Highly recommend "How simple can it be?" and "The original guide to football periodization".

There are a bit pricey but excellent if you have bought into the FFA's philosophy.

https://webshop.worldfootballacademy.com/

The "Football Theory" book on the site is new and to me is a bit light on volume wise for the price. If you do get it, would be very interested in your views.

Also "The Coaching Philosophies of Louis van Gaal and the Ajax Coaches" is dirt cheap on Kindle via Amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/Coaching-Philosophies-Louis-Gaal-Coaches/dp/1890946036/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1455592313&sr=8-2&keywords=van+gaal


Thank you. I'll get the the "How simple can it be?" book but not just yet. Raymond Verheijen also some interesting things to say. I'm got about three football books to read.
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theFOOTBALLlover wrote:
biscuitman1871 wrote:
theFOOTBALLlover wrote:


That sounds like a great course. I'm always looking to learn. I read a lot of football books. Would you recommend any courses or books? You seem to be well informed on coach education.


Highly recommend "How simple can it be?" and "The original guide to football periodization".

There are a bit pricey but excellent if you have bought into the FFA's philosophy.

https://webshop.worldfootballacademy.com/

The "Football Theory" book on the site is new and to me is a bit light on volume wise for the price. If you do get it, would be very interested in your views.

Also "The Coaching Philosophies of Louis van Gaal and the Ajax Coaches" is dirt cheap on Kindle via Amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/Coaching-Philosophies-Louis-Gaal-Coaches/dp/1890946036/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1455592313&sr=8-2&keywords=van+gaal


Thank you. I'll get the the "How simple can it be?" book but not just yet. Raymond Verheijen also some interesting things to say. I'm got about three football books to read.


Good choice. Meant to suggest reading "How simple can it be?" first as it provides great context for the periodisation book which is excellent but quite dense. Only downside to getting them separately is paying two lots of postage.

It is my understanding that coaches who went to the State conferences in 2014 that Verheijen appeared at got a copy of the periodisation book so it could be worth asking around.

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theFOOTBALLlover wrote:

That sounds like a great course. I'm always looking to learn. I read a lot of football books. Would you recommend any courses or books? You seem to be well informed on coach education.


Definitely some good ones , if you haven't read them.

*Inverting The Pyramid - Jonathon Wilson

This book is great for learning about the evolution of tactical systems. One other 442 poster, Localstar who has astonishing historical knowledge of football , knew most of it and found it tedious. Most find it illuminating.



*Soccernomics - Simon Kuper

Very interesting about football scenarios in various countries. Kuper is half Dutch, half English. With all the data and info he provides about English football it is no surprise they chronically underachieve. Interesting insights in to how French clubs operate compared to English clubs.




*The Football Men - Simon Kuper

Some interesting anecdotes about players and coaches. Amongst other interesting football phenomena I learnt how frustrated Guus was coaching English national players at Chelsea.



*Football Against The Enemy - Simon Kuper

Historical rivalries in football.



*Why England Lose - Simon Kuper



*Soccer Systems & Strategies - Jens Bangsbo & Birger Peitersen

Good for formations and the variations of the 4-4-2 midfield configurations.



* Brilliant Orange - David Winner

Good understanding of the Dutch culture in football. It is very educated compared to England.



* Cloughie - Brian Clough

Interesting autobiographical insight into one of the greatest coaches of all time anywhere in the world and his partnership with Peter Taylor from his own perspective. Yet the Football Association wouldn't give him the job as English coach - more of this in Soccernomics.



*20 years With Brian Clough - Duncan Hamilton

Hamilton was a journo working with Clough. Great insights into an incredible coach. Hamilton also sees humour that really appeals to everyone except Clough himself and the suppressed players under his tutelage , in almost everything Clough does.

Clough/Taylor were so good, they are probably the only two who don't need to do coaching courses, apart from them picking up tactical/technical trends. They were so good, Notts Forest won two successive EUFA Champ League titles with a tiny budget compared to most of their opponents. The only English coaching combo, or any nationality of that matter, to achieve this.

Taylor's ability to spot talent, in players nobody else could see anything in, often from lower divisions, then recruit them to Forest or Derby County under Clough's tutelage and turn them into championship winners was astonishing. Taylor was often an anonymous face in the crowd and would leave a game at half time, already having appraised a player.

Shame Robbie Slater and Craig Johnston, both who were under signing consideration, particularly the latter, didn't play under Clough/Taylor.

Clough's Achilles heel was the bottle. Alcoholism eventually destroyed his judgement.

Also one of the funniest books I've read.




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Anther massive divergence from previous FFA policy is the role of mentors in clubs. FFA recognises that they may even be unqualified.

FFA now perceives mentors as being paramount in the decentralisation of coach education.

This is the antithesis of the previous image that FFA tried to convey under Berger's tenure. I'm not sure who of Luke Casserley, Ange, Abrams, and even our Tassie CEO, Mike Palmer , were instrumental in this new approach , but it is such a magnanimous gesture to clubs by FFA compared to before.

FFA now recognise that there are untrained entities who operate in football clubs who have great influence and and perform a positive role in those milieus.

State TDs will now work with club TDs and mentors in collaboratively planning what is needed at particular clubs. FFA state TDs will have to consider the desires and needs of clubs as identified by club TDs and mentors.

In Tassie 4 out of our last 6 FFA state TDs have had a very autocratic attitude to clubs from what they perceived was a position of superior knowledge in all matters football.

Many reading this will be gobsmacked by this change in FFA attitude.
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biscuitman1871 wrote:
theFOOTBALLlover wrote:


That sounds like a great course. I'm always looking to learn. I read a lot of football books. Would you recommend any courses or books? You seem to be well informed on coach education.


Highly recommend "How simple can it be?" and "The original guide to football periodization".

There are a bit pricey but excellent if you have bought into the FFA's philosophy.

https://webshop.worldfootballacademy.com/

The "Football Theory" book on the site is new and to me is a bit light on volume wise for the price. If you do get it, would be very interested in your views.

Also "The Coaching Philosophies of Louis van Gaal and the Ajax Coaches" is dirt cheap on Kindle via Amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/Coaching-Philosophies-Louis-Gaal-Coaches/dp/1890946036/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1455592313&sr=8-2&keywords=van+gaal


Thanks.

I'll add this to the Football Books thread.
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Decentric wrote:
Anther massive divergence from previous FFA policy is the role of mentors in clubs. FFA recognises that they may even be unqualified.

FFA now perceives mentors as being paramount in the decentralisation of coach education.

This is the antithesis of the previous image that FFA tried to convey under Berger's tenure. I'm not sure who of Luke Casserley, Ange, Abrams, and even our Tassie CEO, Mike Palmer , were instrumental in this new approach , but it is such a magnanimous gesture to clubs by FFA compared to before.

FFA now recognise that there are untrained entities who operate in football clubs who have great influence and and perform a positive role in those milieus.

State TDs will now work with club TDs and mentors in collaboratively planning what is needed at particular clubs. FFA state TDs will have to consider the desires and needs of clubs as identified by club TDs and mentors.

In Tassie 4 out of our last 6 FFA state TDs have had a very autocratic attitude to clubs from what they perceived was a position of superior knowledge in all matters football.

Many reading this will be gobsmacked by this change in FFA attitude.


Great to see, hopefully this will happen in NSW soon. =d>
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Decentric wrote:
theFOOTBALLlover wrote:

That sounds like a great course. I'm always looking to learn. I read a lot of football books. Would you recommend any courses or books? You seem to be well informed on coach education.


Definitely some good ones , if you haven't read them.

*Inverting The Pyramid - Jonathon Wilson

This book is great for learning about the evolution of tactical systems. One other 442 poster, Localstar who has astonishing historical knowledge of football , knew most of it and found it tedious. Most find it illuminating.



*Soccernomics - Simon Kuper

Very interesting about football scenarios in various countries. Kuper is half Dutch, half English. With all the data and info he provides about English football it is no surprise they chronically underachieve. Interesting insights in to how French clubs operate compared to English clubs.




*The Football Men - Simon Kuper

Some interesting anecdotes about players and coaches. Amongst other interesting football phenomena I learnt how frustrated Guus was coaching English national players at Chelsea.



*Football Against The Enemy - Simon Kuper

Historical rivalries in football.



*Why England Lose - Simon Kuper



*Soccer Systems & Strategies - Jens Bangsbo & Birger Peitersen

Good for formations and the variations of the 4-4-2 midfield configurations.



* Brilliant Orange - David Winner

Good understanding of the Dutch culture in football. It is very educated compared to England.



* Cloughie - Brian Clough

Interesting autobiographical insight into one of the greatest coaches of all time anywhere in the world and his partnership with Peter Taylor from his own perspective. Yet the Football Association wouldn't give him the job as English coach - more of this in Soccernomics.



*20 years With Brian Clough - Duncan Hamilton

Hamilton was a journo working with Clough. Great insights into an incredible coach. Hamilton also sees humour that really appeals to everyone except Clough himself and the suppressed players under his tutelage , in almost everything Clough does.

Clough/Taylor were so good, they are probably the only two who don't need to do coaching courses, apart from them picking up tactical/technical trends. They were so good, Notts Forest won two successive EUFA Champ League titles with a tiny budget compared to most of their opponents. The only English coaching combo, or any nationality of that matter, to achieve this.

Taylor's ability to spot talent, in players nobody else could see anything in, often from lower divisions, then recruit them to Forest or Derby County under Clough's tutelage and turn them into championship winners was astonishing. Taylor was often an anonymous face in the crowd and would leave a game at half time, already having appraised a player.

Shame Robbie Slater and Craig Johnston, both who were under signing consideration, particularly the latter, didn't play under Clough/Taylor.

Clough's Achilles heel was the bottle. Alcoholism eventually destroyed his judgement.

Also one of the funniest books I've read.





I've only read Inverting the Pyramind but I found it boring. I've got Brilliant Orange and Soccernomics waiting. Just need to finish The Numbers Game.

Thanks for the rest.
GO


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