Dribbling compilation of great players ( and how to do the techniques)


Dribbling compilation of great players ( and how to do the techniques)...

Author
Message
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YU-k-Ots3iY


I let the previous dribbling compilation of players elapse, as UEFA took a lot of them off the internet.



In this thread, there are dribbling compilations of Cruyff, Ronaldo, George Best, Thierry Henry, Zidane, Cristiano Ronaldo, Maradona, Messi, Denilson, Baggio, Robben, Iniesta.




However, I've found other sources for the same videos.




Here is Johann Cruyff.

He uses:

Shoulder feints, also known as body swerves - on the left and right using the outside of the foot, feinting one way and going the other.

Cruyff Cuts - the flashy move where he fakes to run one way, then takes it in reverse, inside of the foot behind his other front leg.

Sole of the foot dribbling.

Fabulous changes of pace.

Great speed.

Terrific acceleration.

Incredible balance, being able to ride tackles.

A few standard cuts.

He is excellent at keeping his head up with the ball at his feet, sometimes even when dribbling around players .

Push/pull or stop/start.



Little can go wrong with these moves apart from timing and distancing, with the notable exception of the Cruyff Cut. When I demonstrate it at my age, 58, it feels like my legs are going to bend.


Cruyff uses no inside and outside stopovers, or Brazilian rolls.





All this stuff is now imparted in the FFA Skills Acquisition Program.










Edited by Decentric: 12/5/2015 08:32:26 AM
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QaBvBjOJ5SI

Here is Ronaldo, from Brazil, when he was a bit slimmer.

Like Cruyff he has:

Fabulous changes of pace.

Great speed.

Terrific acceleration, but not as great as Cruyff's.

Incredible balance, being able to ride tackles.

He is excellent at keeping his head up with the ball at his feet, sometimes even when dribbling around players .



Specific techniques Ronaldo uses:

*The Brazilian elastic -This is one of the few moves I can't do consistently enough , even slowly. I can execute it about 3 times out of 10, which is not enough to coach players how to do it.

It involves pushing the ball outwards with the top part of the outside of the preferred foot, then swivelling the ball on the end of one's foot/toe and bringing it back inside with the inside of the preferred foot.

It is a Brazilian move, performed superbly by Ronaldo on frequent occasions in the video.

I had an assistant coach who could did this well, but couldn't do the much easier shoulder feint.:roll:


*Shoulder feints, also known as body swerves - on the left and right uasingthe outside of the foot , feinting one way and going the other.

*Sole of the foot dribbling.

* Reverse stepovers

* Brazilian stepovers

* Brazilian rolls - sideways or diagonal rolling over the ball with the sole of the foot.

* La Croqueta - inside to inside of the foot dribbling, alternating both feet, often at an angle of circa 45 degrees.

* Zidane 360 degree turns- when one puts their right sole of the foot on the ball to stop it, swivels the body at 360 degrees imilataneously sole of the foot dribbling the ball backwards with the other foot.

I've coached players who can do this well, but cannot do the much easier shoulder feint.:roll:



More of Ronaldo's technciques are difficult and highly technical where more can go wrong than Cruyff's. However, they are spectacular when they come off.=d>







Edited by Decentric: 1/5/2015 12:53:08 AM
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
I will upload a Denilson one soon. It is a bit short though.

I'v seen one Cristiano Ronaldo video, but the footage is not clear.

If anyone else can upload some other videos od great players dribbling it would be good. There is so much available on Youtube now.:)
quickflick
quickflick
World Class
World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 5.4K, Visits: 0
Excellent.

Love the Cruyff turn. When I played more (not at a particularly high level, mind), I'd do it whenever the chance presented and it was appropriate.

I found step-overs hard to do. This may have been due to a lack of close control and technique, on my part. But it just didn't happen naturally for me. I could do them, but it would rarely happen and I've probably only done them near full pace on a handful of occasions. I'm rather pigeon-toed so I wonder if that had any impact. I was much happier trying to take as many small touches as possible, maybe doing something along the lines of La Croqueta. If you have really good control and you're moving quickly, you can suddenly sense your opponent is weaker in one area or isn't covering an angle, and you exploit and accelerate.

In this respect, I found the Cruyff turn invaluable. Because what I did have was good acceleration and change of pace. So if you wrong foot your opponent with the Cruyff turn you then have the benefit of being able to turn off your hip. I found it easy to generate a lot of power and therefore acceleration in that way. It was great fun because it made it possible to open up a heck of a lot of space.

Edited by quickflick: 1/5/2015 04:47:18 AM
quickflick
quickflick
World Class
World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 5.4K, Visits: 0
Decentric

When you say you've coached players who can do this well, but not can't do the more simple shoulder feints, what does 'this' refer to? Do you mean the Zidane 360 turns?

That's encouraging because they're very tough to do. I saw Zidane interviewed and he said he never premeditated doing those. It just sort of happened on instinct. Do the players you coach do them in a premeditated fashion? I occasionally did them when I was younger and, like Zidane, I found it just happened in an instant sort of by instinct. As a matter of fact, I did one (only at like half pace) in indoor last Sunday. But it's a great move, especially when you have two opponents try and dispossess you at the same time.

Also can you possibly refer to the specific times in the video when Cruyff does his shoulder feints?
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
quickflick wrote:
Decentric

When you say you've coached players who can do this well, but not can't do the more simple shoulder feints, what does 'this' refer to? Do you mean the Zidane 360 turns?


The Zidane 360 degree turns and the Brazilian Elastics are moves that some players have been able to do, but not the dead easy shoulder feint.

In the HAL players use the shoulder feint all the time in 1v1 evasion moves . It is simply dribbling with the outside of the foot. Often the body automatically feints if one shapes to do the shoulder feint by simply dribbling with the outside of the foot.

Cruyff did it a lot in his video.
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
quickflick wrote:
Decentric


Also can you possibly refer to the specific times in the video when Cruyff does his shoulder feints?


In the Cruyff video, he does shoulder feint on the left wing, with his left foot , evading the defender as soon as the black and white footage appears. It is shortly after the video starts and the two teams in colour have been on show.

It is about the third or fourth caption of him playing against a team.

He prefers to shoulder feint on his right side of the body.

Good questions, Quickflick.

This is where Australian players are so weak - 1v1 attacking skills.

If one views the Aussie under 16s, who are products of SAP, they can do most of this stuff in the Ronaldo and Cruyff videos.. They are completely different players from past generations.

I coach this by breaking techniques down into compartments and slowly at first, like I was taught in karate, then increasing the speed in realistic scenarios against passive defenders, who eventually become active.

Players need to practice all the time. Some kids/adults I've coached have lost their skills, as they've not been encouraged, or built on, by subsequent coaches.





Edited by Decentric: 1/5/2015 08:42:03 AM
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
quickflick wrote:
Excellent.


I found step-overs hard to do. This may have been due to a lack of close control and technique, on my part. But it just didn't happen naturally for me. I could do them, but it would rarely happen and I've probably only done them near full pace on a handful of occasions. I'm rather pigeon-toed so I wonder if that had any impact. I was much happier trying to take as many small touches as possible, maybe doing something along the lines of La Croqueta. If you have really good control and you're moving quickly, you can suddenly sense your opponent is weaker in one area or isn't covering an angle, and you exploit and accelerate.

In this respect, I found the Cruyff turn invaluable. Because what I did have was good acceleration and change of pace. So if you wrong foot your opponent with the Cruyff turn you then have the benefit of being able to turn off your hip. I found it easy to generate a lot of power and therefore acceleration in that way. It was great fun because it made it possible to open up a heck of a lot of space.

Edited by quickflick: 1/5/2015 04:47:18 AM


The Cruyff turn, I found harder to do than stepovers.

There is a brilliant Brazilian Soccer Schools video for developing complex Brazilian stopovers and rolls.

What I've observed though, is that the only moves a player needs are what Cruyff and Messi do, which are not flashy, apart from the Cruyff Turn.

As a current player do you have any views for the thread on here for players continuing to develop as seniors?





Edited by Decentric: 1/5/2015 01:28:12 PM
New Signing
New Signing
Semi-Pro
Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 1.5K, Visits: 0
The elastico is the one i have never perfected and it shits me like you wouldnt believe, the rest are pretty straight forward.

There is also a move that CR7 does quite a bit where it sort of incorporates the cruyf turn only to bring the ball the whole way around his standing led. I think ive only ever actually sucessfully used it twice
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
New Signing wrote:
The elastico is the one i have never perfected and it shits me like you wouldnt believe, the rest are pretty straight forward.

There is also a move that CR7 does quite a bit where it sort of incorporates the cruyf turn only to bring the ball the whole way around his standing led. I think ive only ever actually sucessfully used it twice


I've spent hours and hours practising it, but still can't do it very well.](*,)

I can do a bastardised version where I roll my foot over the top of the ball out to the side before doing the second part, but it isn't as good.

I 'm just gobsmacked that I had an assistant coach, about 20 years of age, who could't even do the simple shoulder feint, but could do a beautiful Elastico.](*,)
Eastern Glory
Eastern Glory
Legend
Legend (21K reputation)Legend (21K reputation)Legend (21K reputation)Legend (21K reputation)Legend (21K reputation)Legend (21K reputation)Legend (21K reputation)Legend (21K reputation)Legend (21K reputation)Legend (21K reputation)Legend (21K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 20K, Visits: 0
Decentric wrote:
quickflick wrote:
Excellent.


I found step-overs hard to do. This may have been due to a lack of close control and technique, on my part. But it just didn't happen naturally for me. I could do them, but it would rarely happen and I've probably only done them near full pace on a handful of occasions. I'm rather pigeon-toed so I wonder if that had any impact. I was much happier trying to take as many small touches as possible, maybe doing something along the lines of La Croqueta. If you have really good control and you're moving quickly, you can suddenly sense your opponent is weaker in one area or isn't covering an angle, and you exploit and accelerate.

In this respect, I found the Cruyff turn invaluable. Because what I did have was good acceleration and change of pace. So if you wrong foot your opponent with the Cruyff turn you then have the benefit of being able to turn off your hip. I found it easy to generate a lot of power and therefore acceleration in that way. It was great fun because it made it possible to open up a heck of a lot of space.

Edited by quickflick: 1/5/2015 04:47:18 AM


The Cruyff turn, I found harder to do than stepovers.

There is a brilliant Brazilian Soccer Schools video for developing complex Brazilian stopovers and rolls.

What I've observed though, is that the only moves a player needs are what Cruyfff and Messi do, which are not flashy, apart from the Cruyff Turn.

As a current player do you have any views for the thread on here for players continuing to develop as seniors?

I've always considered the Cryuff turn to be super basic. Learned all those coever moves in under 10s and have always passed them on to teams I coach. I find they are excellent for allowing players to turn away from a defender and get their head up with the additional time and space.
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
I find Brazilian stepovers, reverse stepovers and combinations of rolls, body swerves, and Matthews Cuts, , as well as flashy combinations of these, that Cristiano does so well, pretty easy to coach.

It was one string I up my bow after having to coach SAP kids who'd been under the tutelage of one of the FFA SAP curriculum writers, who is an outstanding junior and youth coach and who is very intelligent and innovative.

However, I can't do the simple Cut that I know of as I haven't been videod. It could look awful.

I had a 14 year old player in a rep side who did it beautifully in games, but him having no idea how to deconstruct it, I could not get him to show other players unless I videoed him.





Edited by Decentric: 1/5/2015 01:37:04 PM
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
Eastern Glory wrote:
Decentric wrote:
quickflick wrote:
Excellent.


I found step-overs hard to do. This may have been due to a lack of close control and technique, on my part. But it just didn't happen naturally for me. I could do them, but it would rarely happen and I've probably only done them near full pace on a handful of occasions. I'm rather pigeon-toed so I wonder if that had any impact. I was much happier trying to take as many small touches as possible, maybe doing something along the lines of La Croqueta. If you have really good control and you're moving quickly, you can suddenly sense your opponent is weaker in one area or isn't covering an angle, and you exploit and accelerate.

In this respect, I found the Cruyff turn invaluable. Because what I did have was good acceleration and change of pace. So if you wrong foot your opponent with the Cruyff turn you then have the benefit of being able to turn off your hip. I found it easy to generate a lot of power and therefore acceleration in that way. It was great fun because it made it possible to open up a heck of a lot of space.

Edited by quickflick: 1/5/2015 04:47:18 AM


The Cruyff turn, I found harder to do than stepovers.

There is a brilliant Brazilian Soccer Schools video for developing complex Brazilian stopovers and rolls.

What I've observed though, is that the only moves a player needs are what Cruyfff and Messi do, which are not flashy, apart from the Cruyff Turn.

As a current player do you have any views for the thread on here for players continuing to develop as seniors?

I've always considered the Cryuff turn to be super basic. Learned all those coever moves in under 10s and have always passed them on to teams I coach. I find they are excellent for allowing players to turn away from a defender and get their head up with the additional time and space.


FFA coaches concede that the SCoerver trained kids are the best technicians.

However, in the past if they were done iin isolation, there was no game sense and relation to match scenarios for them.

The SAP is supposedly Coerver in context, where players also develop game sense.

EG, if you have those Coerver techniques, they are excellent for coaching. Combining it with the rondo exercises I sent you, makes for good coaching.:)
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
Eastern Glory wrote:
Decentric wrote:
quickflick wrote:
Excellent.


I found step-overs hard to do. This may have been due to a lack of close control and technique, on my part. But it just didn't happen naturally for me. I could do them, but it would rarely happen and I've probably only done them near full pace on a handful of occasions. I'm rather pigeon-toed so I wonder if that had any impact. I was much happier trying to take as many small touches as possible, maybe doing something along the lines of La Croqueta. If you have really good control and you're moving quickly, you can suddenly sense your opponent is weaker in one area or isn't covering an angle, and you exploit and accelerate.

In this respect, I found the Cruyff turn invaluable. Because what I did have was good acceleration and change of pace. So if you wrong foot your opponent with the Cruyff turn you then have the benefit of being able to turn off your hip. I found it easy to generate a lot of power and therefore acceleration in that way. It was great fun because it made it possible to open up a heck of a lot of space.

Edited by quickflick: 1/5/2015 04:47:18 AM


The Cruyff turn, I found harder to do than stepovers.

There is a brilliant Brazilian Soccer Schools video for developing complex Brazilian stopovers and rolls.

What I've observed though, is that the only moves a player needs are what Cruyfff and Messi do, which are not flashy, apart from the Cruyff Turn.

As a current player do you have any views for the thread on here for players continuing to develop as seniors?

I've always considered the Cryuff turn to be super basic. Learned all those coever moves in under 10s and have always passed them on to teams I coach. I find they are excellent for allowing players to turn away from a defender and get their head up with the additional time and space.


Even our best players in Australia cannot ge their head up and do those Coerver techniques against defenders in match scenarios, apart from Rogic and Burns.







Edited by Decentric: 1/5/2015 01:43:24 PM
pv4
pv4
Legend
Legend (12K reputation)Legend (12K reputation)Legend (12K reputation)Legend (12K reputation)Legend (12K reputation)Legend (12K reputation)Legend (12K reputation)Legend (12K reputation)Legend (12K reputation)Legend (12K reputation)Legend (12K reputation)

Group: Moderators
Posts: 12K, Visits: 0
The person I consider to be the best coach I've ever had told me that every player should have 3 different tricks in their arsenal, that they know very instictually and can execute them flawlessly. But not tricks as in to take a player one on one and nutmegs him, but rather to get a change of direction and free yourself from pressure for a brief time - similar to what EG is talking about above. And you need 3 because if you're cornered in somewhere and only use the 1, it will be predictable the next time. But 3 tricks, that each individual can choose on their own, to get a change of direction, should be imprinted in each players mind. How extravegent (sp) these tricks are is up to the individual player.

Over the last 2-3 years I have begun to rely a lot more on stop-start dribbling. It's amazing how effective it is to be running the ball, with a defender chasing you, for you to put a foot on the ball to stop it, but then instantly touch it the same direction you were going again. The defenders movement to stop running to react to the original ball stop, then face you, gives you SO much freedom to continue running as they'll need to turn around to chase you again. I've slowly been developing it into an intergral part of my game - and as I progress I become more comfortable in changing direction as I stop the ball, and it adds an incredible amount of unpredictability to my game to the point where you truly do feel you have the defender in your pocket. For a HAL-specific example of the type of dribbling I'm talking about, watch Andrew Hoole this season.


Barca4Life
Barca4Life
Legend
Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 9.8K, Visits: 0


Edited by Barca4life: 1/5/2015 05:23:09 PM
quickflick
quickflick
World Class
World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 5.4K, Visits: 0
Decentric wrote:
quickflick wrote:
Excellent.


I found step-overs hard to do. This may have been due to a lack of close control and technique, on my part. But it just didn't happen naturally for me. I could do them, but it would rarely happen and I've probably only done them near full pace on a handful of occasions. I'm rather pigeon-toed so I wonder if that had any impact. I was much happier trying to take as many small touches as possible, maybe doing something along the lines of La Croqueta. If you have really good control and you're moving quickly, you can suddenly sense your opponent is weaker in one area or isn't covering an angle, and you exploit and accelerate.

In this respect, I found the Cruyff turn invaluable. Because what I did have was good acceleration and change of pace. So if you wrong foot your opponent with the Cruyff turn you then have the benefit of being able to turn off your hip. I found it easy to generate a lot of power and therefore acceleration in that way. It was great fun because it made it possible to open up a heck of a lot of space.

Edited by quickflick: 1/5/2015 04:47:18 AM


The Cruyff turn, I found harder to do than stepovers.

There is a brilliant Brazilian Soccer Schools video for developing complex Brazilian stopovers and rolls.

What I've observed though, is that the only moves a player needs are what Cruyff and Messi do, which are not flashy, apart from the Cruyff Turn.

As a current player do you have any views for the thread on here for players continuing to develop as seniors?





Edited by Decentric: 1/5/2015 01:28:12 PM



I'm not a current player. I just play indoor these days. It's mickey mouse stuff for us. I'm considering going back to outdoor football, but commitment-wise I'm not sure. I'm 23 turning 24, so a good age to get back into it at an amateur level. The main issue is it's hard to juggle the commitment football demands, with full-time study, part-time work (which I'm between at the moment, but will be doing soon), gym commitments/goals and then the fact that I try to spend as much of the summer holidays overseas as possible.

Then if you throw in stuff like doing internships (which I'm not doing now but am being pressured into), extra study for postgrad stuff and the fact that I'm teaching myself Swedish (as I intend to go there for at least one year after my undergrad is done), it's very difficult. It's a shame because one of the happiest times of my life was when I was between the age of 14 and 16, playing around 16 hours of football a week formally, plus whatever I did on my own.

My own experience, from playing football as a teenager (and I certainly didn't play at state level), is that it can be quite difficult to translate these skills, which one might be able to do in small-sided drills, onto the pitch in real match situations. Apart from anything, in real match situations they're of secondary importance compared to first touch, passing and positioning. But you see, what I found was that, in the small-sided drills, I found that I was fairly decent on the ball in the sense that I could feint, I could do Johan Cruyff turns well, I could (sometimes) do the Zidane 360 degree turns (usually unintentionally). When I was in form I was good at taking lots of little touches, sometimes doing things like pv4 talks about, and opening up space in that way. From there, my strength was acceleration and vision (I could weight passes quite nicely, I thought). The trouble was that in match situations, I could not quite produce these skills in quite that way. Sometimes it happened, but not as often as I would have liked. I'm not sure if it was the pressure or what. The other problem was that, doing these 1 vs 1 things at a young age, or against poorly-educated opponents, was one thing. I even managed to do such things in PE class with/against guys who have subsequently become highly successful AFL players. But it felt absurdly difficult to do these 1 vs 1 things against bigger (sometimes older) guys who knew how to defend.

Plus I wasn't the most confident of players. It was weird. Some days, maybe if I felt the coach didn't have much confidence in my ability, I couldn't do these things, even at training. The same might happen if it was a really big game. Plus, my technique let me down in terms of first touch, when I was really nervous. I was never good in the air. And when I was really nervous, my passing just went out the door. So for me, it was a psychological battle as much as anything. I really wish I had sorted that out.

Because other times, when I just didn't give a shit about anything or (somehow) believed that I could do anything, I found that I was doing some really nice stuff on the ball. I felt, at such times, and this especially happened in small-sided games, that it would be so good if one of the scouts saw those games. Because that was when I was getting to the level I was capable of. But this level was not reached enough in 11 vs 11. The other thing was that in possession games, all I thought about was passing, positioning and touch, in order to maintain possession. It was nice and simple. As soon as it's 11 vs 11 and you see the ball that much less and the object is to score goals, then it became mentally tougher and the quality I provided decreased.

But this might just be me. I have known and played with some really talented footballers who can do the most remarkable things in match situations against any kind of opponent. They're not only technically and tactically very gifted, they're also always confident. Confidence is key, I think.

Edited by quickflick: 2/5/2015 12:56:35 AM
quickflick
quickflick
World Class
World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 5.4K, Visits: 0
Here are two videos of Thierry Henry

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ko5jBnTn9hU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxVjd7lcUp0

They're not specifically dribbling. The first is his best 25 goals for Arsenal. Obviously you see a lot of dribbling. My favourite is goal number 5 at 7:09. Staggeringly good dribbling. When his opponents chase after him, he just seems to get faster and faster. He has extra gears.

The second, which has some annoying camera angles, is of his best skills. There are some remarkable feats of dribbling in the second.

Decentric, you've mentioned how Cruyff and Messi don't rely on the (Cristiano) Ronaldo-esque kind of moves. The take lots of small touches and feints, so too did Henry, it seemed to me.

He's one of my favourite ever footballers (and I'm a Liverpool fan). He just seemed to have a really natural control of the ball. Combine that with his speed and it was some of the most aesthetically pleasing football ever played. He just oozed elegance.

Curiously, if you look at goals number 5 and number 2 (in the first video), although he's ridiculously fast and has really close control, he seems to pause and slow down for a fraction of a second as he chooses the next bit of space to exploit.
quickflick
quickflick
World Class
World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)World Class (5.6K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 5.4K, Visits: 0
Decentric

I'll try to address some of the points/insight you have. I find it interesting to make sense of the notion that no senior Australian player (save Rogic and Burns) can do these more flashy things in match situations against defenders. It's also interesting (and very encouraging) if lots of the Australia U17s have most of these skills at their disposal. Also how important are they? I don't disagree with you that it's not really all that necessary for a player to do.

I was in Rome last year, backpacking. It was a summer night and I, along with a couple of other Aussie guys who were staying at the same hostel, had gone for a drink. A couple of English guys joined our group. One of the Aussie guys, who was probably interested in football but not that well-versed, was asking the English guy who he thought was the best footballer. I can't remember exactly how it went. But basically, the English guy probably explained that there were different types of footballers. I think he said that Cristiano Ronaldo is the most complete attacking footballer in the world (i.e. he has sublime touch, an outstanding shot, good on both feet, he has brilliant close control, all these remarkable 1 vs 1 skills, phenomenal speed and lovely vision). I agreed. I think I added that I thought Lionel Messi was the best natural footballer in the world today.

The Aussie guy then suggested something along the lines of Zlatan Ibrahimovic being the best footballer in the world. The English guy was appalled. Granted, Zlatan is amazing. I said to the Aussie guy. Zlatan is hands down the best in the world at doing overhead kicks from outside the penalty box and scoring. But often is that required in a match? The English guy then said that probably his favourite footballer ever was Paul Scholes. You rarely saw Scholes try to dribble around anybody. But his passing and positioning was so phenomenal that he opened up acres of space. He was just a very, very intelligent footballer.

So it's really a horses for courses kind of thing. I agree that doing Ronaldo-esque tricks is not always necessary. But I think they demonstrate outstanding levels of technique and ball control. If a student goes into a year eleven chemistry exam, but able to compete at the level of a year twelve, that's going to stand him in good stead.

What I found worrying in the past was that loads of Aussie kids were so appalling in 1 vs 1 situations. When I was in Paris in 2008/2009, I saw heaps of youngsters who not only had sublime touch (they'd kick the ball really high in the air and trap it perfectly), lots of them seemed to have these 1 vs 1 skills.

It's hugely encouraging if the U17s have lots of such skills. They don't necessarily need to use them a lot in match situations, but they'll be better footballers for having that ability. It also gives them more options.

I agree with pv4, that if a player has 3 good skills to get them out of trouble, that's pretty much all they need. I would also add that if a player can sprint around cones at a fast speed, while taking lots of precise, little touches, and turn this way and that, then they're going to find it much easier to master these 1 vs 1 skills. That in and of itself is a kind of skill you see in players like Messi and Henry.

We don't need to see every player able to do these remarkable tricks. But we need to see some who can do step-overs and Zidane 360 degree turns near full speed. It just adds a lot more to our repertoire.

Ideally, a team should have maybe two players who can do those extra tricks, then most of the others should be competent at feints and such like. Think about the benefit of having a player with all the tricks of Cristiano Ronaldo playing in the same team as a player as clever as Paul Scholes. Scholes distributes beautifully and Ronaldo can get past anybody and automatically opens up the game as soon as he gets the ball (so cautious are the opposition).

Looking at the next World Cup. If we have Rogic fitting in behind the strikers, that will add a lot to our game plan. He has those amazing 1 vs 1 skills. We may well also have Burns who is good in 1 vs 1. Then there's the likes of Kruse who aren't as good in 1 vs 1, but more than talented enough to cause top class opposition sides headaches. Then (and this is a big if) if somebody like Ikonomidis or Armenakas can come to the fore and also has that 1 vs 1 ability, it's going to mean we have that attacking repertoire. Throw in the distribution skills of guys like Brillante and Milligan.

It's all about having the combination of the right skills. The issue for Australian football, in the past, has been weaknesses in certain areas. Hopefully this is being fixed.

Edited by quickflick: 2/5/2015 02:49:55 AM
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXqPEpeokCg


Here is a youtube clip of the Brazilian Elastic, or Elastico.

Ronaldinho is performing it in match scenarios.

It is weird as to who can do it. A number of players I've coached, or players, who can hardly do any of what I find the easier easier evasion 1v1 techniques, can do this. They cannot necessarily execute it in match scenarios, but can individually with no player resistance. This is a move that New Signing and I find virtually impossible.

It is a brilliant evasion move. I have never seen one Australian professional player do it successfully on the pitch. It is a specific Brazilian move. A plethora of Brazilians can do it well in match scenarios, but I've seen few outside that county execute it successfully.

In the second post I've put up in this thread, Ronaldo is so good at it, he even nutmegs people with the second part of the move with the inside part of the foot .=d>










Edited by Decentric: 2/5/2015 09:40:06 AM
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
pv4 wrote:
The person I consider to be the best coach I've ever had told me that every player should have 3 different tricks in their arsenal, that they know very instictually and can execute them flawlessly.



I'd almost simplify this to the shoulder feint, on both sides of the body.

This is also a good technique for receiving and feinting at the same time, if turning blind from the back of the pitch trying to turn and face forwards.

If someone at least has this, and this is probably the case with most HAL players, it extrapolates to a lot of different scenarios and is the basis for a lot other moves.






Edited by Decentric: 4/5/2015 07:00:27 PM
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
quickflick wrote:
Here are two videos of Thierry Henry

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ko5jBnTn9hU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxVjd7lcUp0

They're not specifically dribbling. The first is his best 25 goals for Arsenal. Obviously you see a lot of dribbling. My favourite is goal number 5 at 7:09. Staggeringly good dribbling. When his opponents chase after him, he just seems to get faster and faster. He has extra gears.

The second, which has some annoying camera angles, is of his best skills. There are some remarkable feats of dribbling in the second.

Decentric, you've mentioned how Cruyff and Messi don't rely on the (Cristiano) Ronaldo-esque kind of moves. The take lots of small touches and feints, so too did Henry, it seemed to me.

He's one of my favourite ever footballers (and I'm a Liverpool fan). He just seemed to have a really natural control of the ball. Combine that with his speed and it was some of the most aesthetically pleasing football ever played. He just oozed elegance.

Curiously, if you look at goals number 5 and number 2 (in the first video), although he's ridiculously fast and has really close control, he seems to pause and slow down for a fraction of a second as he chooses the next bit of space to exploit.


Cruyff and Messi take lots of small touches, true, which is probably termed part of Running With The Ball.

The feints they take are what are termed shoulder feints/body swerves.
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
http://www.ehow.com/video_2360374_do-matthews-turn-soccer.html


I call this the shoulder feint, body swerve.

Many footballers viewing this will be able to do this.

The Matthews Turn or Cut is a little different. Some find this variation easier than the Shoulder Feint.

All the players one will see in the videos will do this move well. It is the basis for many other 1v1 evasion moves.
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
quickflick wrote:

I'm not a current player. I just play indoor these days. It's mickey mouse stuff for us. I'm considering going back to outdoor football, but commitment-wise I'm not sure. I'm 23 turning 24, so a good age to get back into it at an amateur level.

My own experience, from playing football as a teenager (and I certainly didn't play at state level), is that it can be quite difficult to translate these skills, which one might be able to do in small-sided drills, onto the pitch in real match situations. Apart from anything, in real match situations they're of secondary importance compared to first touch, passing and positioning.


That is what was perceived in the past in Australia.

Now they are deemed to have equal importance.

Even our best players are so weak in 1v1 attacking evasion qualities, we have to have a very well thought out game plan, and very astute tactics to win matches.

FFA consider that many Asian nations are vastly superior technically to us. However, they are deemed to be behind tactically.

So few of our players can change a game, and create a chance on goal from individual brilliance, apart from the Australian Under 16s, who are products of SAP.

Also, because our players have such poor attacking 1v1 skills, our defenders are not as good as some of our opponents, at delaying, jockeying and showing when defending.

Nathan Burns, Cirio, Broich, prodably find it easier competing against Aussie HAL defenders than a lot of international opposition. This was exemplified when Burns played Germany and Macedonia. He wasn't as effective as in the HAL against defenders who probably encountered better dribblers in club football.

Nevertheless, Burns beat two German defenders in succession and forced a fingertip save from the German keeper. This is a very rare event for any Aussie payer, because we've neglected 1v1 attacking evasion skills in the past.

Even some state youth coaches I know, even decent NPL players in their careers, cannot do any 1v1 dribbling moves, so they haven't coached them.

Other than Coerver, where are these kids supposed to learn 1v1 evasion moves and practice them on the training ground against defenders over and over?

This is what SAP is doing. It is like Coerver, with game sense and applying it in game related scenarios.

I have three outstanding drills for developing 1v1 evasion skills, all learnt from decent coaches or European youth academies. They are also really hard on players in terms of conditioning.








Edited by Decentric: 2/5/2015 03:37:55 PM
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68vX7Hu_c-0


Lionel Messi.

The usual excellent balance, changes of pace, incredible acceleration, with superb control, like the ball is stuck to his feet.

Most of Messi, features fast ball carrying, or running with the ball, interspersed with judicious shoulder feints, mainly on his preferred left side.

Ronaldo uses so many more techniques than Messi, but the Argentinian is probably even better in 1v1 attacking evasion moves.







Edited by Decentric: 2/5/2015 12:19:12 PM
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
http://www.videojug.com/film/combination-ronaldinho-and-ronaldo-stepover

This is a combination of three key Brazilian moves. On may never be able to use it on the pitch in game, but it makes other moves, and any of the rolls, step overs or reverse step overs easy if done individually, seem a lot simpler.

1. It comprises a Brazilian roll with one foot.

2. A Brazilian step over with the same foot.

3. A Brazilian roll with the other foot.

4. An outside or reverse step over with the same foot.

I can do this slowly, at a moderate speed. It impresses any player of any level or ability, because it is too hard to decipher if done even at moderate speed.

However, I still cannot do the Elastico and I'm not sure about the Standard Cut.](*,)

In some videos of Cristiano Ronaldo, Ronaldinho, Denilson and Ronaldo, I've seen them do the Ronaldinho or Ronaldo by themselves. Denilson also does it in a video I'll upload in this thread.

I've seen Archie do these in warm ups, but rarely in games, but breaking them into individual parts he did them a lot in his earlier years.

Dukes could do them, but didn't have the acceleration to get past opponents.



In the video the coach does what one should always do - slow it down to a very slow pace and break it into components.
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
http://www.videojug.com/film/the-ronaldo-step-over?channel=sports-and-outdoors

This is the second part of the previous move in the preceding post.

This is a very intimidating move, because one rushes forwards at a defender, whilst the ball is blocked by leg and body.

What it doesn't show you in the video is that an outside of the foot cut/ shoulder feint can be used to complete the move, taking the ball away from the opponent, whilst still keeping the body in between the opponent and the ball.

The Australian under 16 players use this move in match scenarios.=d>





Edited by Decentric: 2/5/2015 03:48:06 PM
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
pv4 wrote:

Over the last 2-3 years I have begun to rely a lot more on stop-start dribbling. It's amazing how effective it is to be running the ball, with a defender chasing you, for you to put a foot on the ball to stop it, but then instantly touch it the same direction you were going again. The defenders movement to stop running to react to the original ball stop, then face you, gives you SO much freedom to continue running as they'll need to turn around to chase you again. I've slowly been developing it into an intergral part of my game - and as I progress I become more comfortable in changing direction as I stop the ball, and it adds an incredible amount of unpredictability to my game to the point where you truly do feel you have the defender in your pocket. For a HAL-specific example of the type of dribbling I'm talking about, watch Andrew Hoole this season.




Heather Garriock the Matildas player does this well.

I'm not sure of the name of the move, but the Tassie head SAP coach also imparts this move to his players. Pertinently, when I coached some of them the following year, none of them could do it, or said they had ever learnt it. ](*,)

Yet I'd seen them work on it it under the SAP coach the previous year! Adolescent hormones.:roll:

When I saw Hoole play against players his own age recently for the Aussie under 23s, he was very impressive. He may have done this move, but I cannot remember it.

Edited by Decentric: 2/5/2015 03:46:41 PM
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jW8iFZy7x_w

Denilson.

He has all the general attributes that Cruyff and Messi have, like balance, speed changes, acceleration, head up whilst ball carrying, etc.

Individually he executes:

*The Ronaldo ( Brazilian Socceor Schools terminology).

This is the first move he does when he appears in the 4th clip, in a white short. close to the beginning of the video. He uses it to intimidate in a sequence of moves.


* The Ronaldo Chop - named after Cristiano Ronaldo. It is a move where one does the reverse or outside step over, then uses the inside of the other (rear) foot behind the step over foot, to play it diagonally at 45 degrees.


Denilson also uses a lot off other techniques used in Ronaldo's clip already posted. Plenty of shoulder feints/body swerves, Brazilian rolls, sole of the foot, and regular Brazilian step overs.












Edited by Decentric: 2/5/2015 04:00:27 PM
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 21K, Visits: 0
quickflick wrote:
Here are two videos of Thierry Henry



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxVjd7lcUp0



The second, which has some annoying camera angles, is of his best skills. There are some remarkable feats of dribbling in the second.

Decentric, you've mentioned how Cruyff and Messi don't rely on the (Cristiano) Ronaldo-esque kind of moves. The take lots of small touches and feints, so too did Henry, it seemed to me.

He's one of my favourite ever footballers (and I'm a Liverpool fan). He just seemed to have a really natural control of the ball. Combine that with his speed and it was some of the most aesthetically pleasing football ever played. He just oozed elegance.
.


Just had a look at the second video.

I've seen him play in a lot of games, but he didn't often try this sort of stuff. He must have been judicious in application, but should have tried his 1v1s more often.

Thierry is simply extraordinary.=d>

Like Messi, Cruyff, Denilson, Ronaldo, he has balance, keeps his head up, incredible acceleration, speed possibly not seen in any of the others and speed changes whilst ball carrying - fast,slow, fast, slow.

However, he is incredible in his ability to ride tackles and may be physically stronger on the ball than anyone else in the thread so far.


Specifically Henry uses:

Most techniques are very simple and easy, but like Messi he executes them brilliantly.

* Extreme pace in Running With The Ball.

* Body swerves

* Matthews Cuts

* Zidane 360s

* La Croquetas

* Standard Cuts




Next I'll chase up Zidane, who didn't have the pace of the others.








Edited by Decentric: 2/5/2015 04:21:52 PM
GO


Select a Forum....























Inside Sport


Search