Youth development in Australia, where did it all go wrong?


Youth development in Australia, where did it all go wrong?

Author
Message
theFOOTBALLlover
theFOOTBALLlover
Rising Star
Rising Star (960 reputation)Rising Star (960 reputation)Rising Star (960 reputation)Rising Star (960 reputation)Rising Star (960 reputation)Rising Star (960 reputation)Rising Star (960 reputation)Rising Star (960 reputation)Rising Star (960 reputation)Rising Star (960 reputation)Rising Star (960 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 932, Visits: 0
Munrubenmuz - 27 Aug 2019 12:00 PM
neverwozza - 27 Aug 2019 12:14 AM

My kid travels by bus 5 and half hours one way every second week to play in the Newcastle NPL comp.  (Leaves at 6am - returns at 10pm.)  They have a squad of 16. Some weeks he gets a full match (less say 10 minutes) other times he only gets 20 minutes.

He will probably give it up next year because of that exact reason.  I understand why the coach does it but I also understand from his perspective why he's losing interest.


Credit to your kid but its survival of the 'fittest'. Players have to earn their time and spot in the 11. We want the strongest in all aspects to rise to the top and the mental part of the game is probably one of the most important parts of it. I was in the same boat as your son and quit at 18. I know realise why and I only blame myself.
Muz
Muz
World Class
World Class (8.6K reputation)World Class (8.6K reputation)World Class (8.6K reputation)World Class (8.6K reputation)World Class (8.6K reputation)World Class (8.6K reputation)World Class (8.6K reputation)World Class (8.6K reputation)World Class (8.6K reputation)World Class (8.6K reputation)World Class (8.6K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 8.3K, Visits: 0
theFOOTBALLlover - 28 Aug 2019 8:33 PM
Munrubenmuz - 27 Aug 2019 12:00 PM

Credit to your kid but its survival of the 'fittest'. Players have to earn their time and spot in the 11. We want the strongest in all aspects to rise to the top and the mental part of the game is probably one of the most important parts of it. I was in the same boat as your son and quit at 18. I know realise why and I only blame myself.

You're 100% right. It is about the mental side as much as anything.  I guess if we were dead serious about turning him into the best footballer he could be we'd pick up the whole family and move towns.  When he played in Brisbane he was in a gun team surrounded by gun players. (He was one of the gun players.)  Had we stayed there he'd be a far better player now.

But we moved towns for a better overall life and, well, here we are. 

I have to give credit to North Coast Football and Newcastle.  The standout kids get invited to camps and trials in Newy and someone from one of the 4 NPL sides is always moving onto bigger and better things.  You'd have to say the net is being cast wider than it used to be.  Everything seems to be a step up in professionalism from only a few years ago.


Member since 2008.


Edited
4 Months Ago by Munrubenmuz
Bunch of Hacks
Bunch of Hacks
Semi-Pro
Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 1.4K, Visits: 0
mountain - 28 Aug 2019 4:23 PM
Releasing players once they turn 19 is a joke. It happens all the time. I think there is a quota players can't be older than 20. At that point the club needs to make a call. Players develop at a later stage, all that talent goes to waste, all that nurturing down the drain. 
the whole system is a shambles. You have players deemed not good enough for the A league make it  in other high quality leagues.

Timotheou initially (Schalke) now somewhere in Belgium, Duncan (AGF Arhuas), John Iredale (Wolfsburg). 
How many more are simply wasted playing yet the league recycles players.

Exactly. Players making it is a random chaotic mix of possibilites and is not linear. Jason Culina for example was at Ajax for years without ever playing a game then got a move to twente at like 24 where he scored over 10 goals from midfirld and suddenly was rusted on starter for socceroos. Never know how players will turn out. No one woukd have ever predicted chippeefield to move to basle like he did at 28 become a club legend and play in the champions league every year 
Barca4Life
Barca4Life
Legend
Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 10K, Visits: 0
Bunch of Hacks - 30 Aug 2019 7:59 PM
mountain - 28 Aug 2019 4:23 PM

Exactly. Players making it is a random chaotic mix of possibilites and is not linear. Jason Culina for example was at Ajax for years without ever playing a game then got a move to twente at like 24 where he scored over 10 goals from midfirld and suddenly was rusted on starter for socceroos. Never know how players will turn out. No one woukd have ever predicted chippeefield to move to basle like he did at 28 become a club legend and play in the champions league every year 

With the current structure in place late developers will never make it here, the cut off with aleague squads is too early and need to be at a level developing those players that come good later on.
scott20won
scott20won
Rising Star
Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 808, Visits: 0
“Like Mazis, Garner and Woods reminded Bernal of a teenage Tom Rogic and hopes they'll be inspired by his journey."Both boys impressed me immediately like the first time I saw Tom Rogic," Bernal said. "We have no A-league club in Canberra so the quicker they get out into a professional environment the better chance they have of becoming top professionals."This is a training and development trip to see where they lie in the football landscape, and be put into the club database for further monitoring."


https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/6357464/two-teens-ready-to-fire-ahead-of-celtic-training-stint/?cs=14237



highkick05
highkick05
Legend
Legend (13K reputation)Legend (13K reputation)Legend (13K reputation)Legend (13K reputation)Legend (13K reputation)Legend (13K reputation)Legend (13K reputation)Legend (13K reputation)Legend (13K reputation)Legend (13K reputation)Legend (13K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 13K, Visits: 0
Massive gaps in youth development. Needs to be some research done in these areas.

I think we need to SEE the connection from

Youth leagues -> A-League & OR NT EXPOSURE -> Overseas. 

Make a name HERE -> THEN go overseas.

NOT! Nobodies , no names, then see them in the NT not knowing who the fug 


Edited
4 Months Ago by highkick05
scott20won
scott20won
Rising Star
Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)Rising Star (833 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 808, Visits: 0
“My loan at Millwall was a big part of my development,” Kane said as he prepared for Tottenham’s FA Cup quarter-final against Millwall at White Hart Lane on Sunday. “I was 18, we were in a relegation battle and it turned me into a man. I played in difficult, high-pressure games and I managed to come out of it positively. I had a great time at the club and it will be interesting to play them again. A lot has changed since I left but I’m looking forward to it.”

https://www.google.se/url?sa=i&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwjOlN67nqvkAhWIAxAIHWqJC1kQzPwBegQIARAB&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.theguardian.com%2Ffootball%2F2017%2Fmar%2F09%2Fharry-kane-loan-millwall-tottenham-fa-cup&psig=AOvVaw3ovXQKo0UeNs5XWEZ7J2Ki&ust=1567276605052398

18 yr old Australian players get to watch Simon and ODonovon head butt opponents from the bench if they are lucky.
Edited
4 Months Ago by scott20won
miron mercedes
miron mercedes
Pro
Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 2.4K, Visits: 0
I am becoming more and more convinced that youth development and football in general is suffering from the stodgy one size fits all National Curriculum.
I believe it is based on the Dutch system and the 443 playing formation.
No one plays 443 at present. 
We need to modernise and show kids different and varying systems from about age ten on .
These kids are smarter than we think and can handle it.
 We also need to let kids play and "show off a bit" if they have some flair...don't coach it out of them...encourage it .

Also ....whilst we needed to get away from the "ethnic" image the old NSL had we have taken it too far .
In the NSL days you had clubs playing varying styles of football. The Croations had free flowing individuals , the Italians a bit of everything , the Dutch were different again .
Each team had varying nationalties playing and coaching . It made for some exciting football.
When you went to NSL games you got different styles depending on who your team was playing .
It was good to watch and play .

Now we have teams all playing similar styles and no one wants to break out of the mould. 
Remember when Ange dared to do it ? "Roarcelona" were born and excited the league for a few years.
We need both junior and senior clubs to be more individual and play different styles.
Our playing style is stale and predictable.
The crowds need to see players who do unexpected things ...to get that junior players have to be allowed to try things as they progress.


petszk
petszk
Pro
Pro (3.6K reputation)Pro (3.6K reputation)Pro (3.6K reputation)Pro (3.6K reputation)Pro (3.6K reputation)Pro (3.6K reputation)Pro (3.6K reputation)Pro (3.6K reputation)Pro (3.6K reputation)Pro (3.6K reputation)Pro (3.6K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 3.5K, Visits: 0
miron mercedes - 4 Sep 2019 1:28 PM
I am becoming more and more convinced that youth development and football in general is suffering from the stodgy one size fits all National Curriculum.
I believe it is based on the Dutch system and the 443 playing formation.
No one plays 443 at present. 


I wish we could play a 443 formation.
Would really help having one more player on the pitch than our opponents!


New Signing
New Signing
Semi-Pro
Semi-Pro (1.6K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.6K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.6K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.6K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.6K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.6K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.6K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.6K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.6K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.6K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.6K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 1.5K, Visits: 0
I still laugh at coaches, players and fans who seem to think they line their players up in a 352, 442, 433 whatever it may be and their job is done. They have no concept of formation fluidity through transition and will defend their position and knowledge on the game till they're blue in the face.........
miron mercedes
miron mercedes
Pro
Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)Pro (2.5K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 2.4K, Visits: 0
petszk - 4 Sep 2019 1:38 PM
miron mercedes - 4 Sep 2019 1:28 PM

I wish we could play a 443 formation.
Would really help having one more player on the pitch than our opponents!

ha ...good pick up ...you know what I meant ...

AJF
AJF
Semi-Pro
Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 1.4K, Visits: 0
@miron, speaking as a current coach, the NC doesn't actually require every coach to use the dutch 433 or any system for that matter What it does is provides a "professional" coaching framework around which coaches can develop their playing philosophies and then develop training plans to achieve them. I can say without doubt that the C-license course and NC has helped improve my coaching but I do not employ the 433 nor everthing in the NC (ie I often dont play a training game at the end of training sessions as I prefer to keep working on a specific game aspect). 

The inflexibility comes from the many "non-football" people who have gotten the coaching badges are using the NC as a crutch to support their lack of knowledge and understanding of football. For example if you played AFL all your life then get your C-license so you can coach your sons team in NPL (no I am not joking there are people like this coaching kids as we speak) all you know is whats in the NC as this is what you picked up during the training so what else can you talk about.

At the top end, your comments about the HAL are spot on and the fear of losing the ball pervades most teams so you end up with thie stodgy passing backwards no risk style of play which often makes the HAL unwatchable. Unfortunately this mentality flows into the HAL academies and when good kids are picked up out of the NPL teams the HAL academies ensure all creativity is drained and keeping possession is the only goal. There are many senior NPL coaches who wont look at returning HAL academy players as they are passing robots (normally backwards) and have difficulty adapting to different styles.

One final observation, I dont particularly rate Arzani as a special player, but one thing he did do was try go forward and be creative, which is so rare in the HAL from Aussie players that people got really excited.











Pasquali
Pasquali
Hacker
Hacker (459 reputation)Hacker (459 reputation)Hacker (459 reputation)Hacker (459 reputation)Hacker (459 reputation)Hacker (459 reputation)Hacker (459 reputation)Hacker (459 reputation)Hacker (459 reputation)Hacker (459 reputation)Hacker (459 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 439, Visits: 0
highkick05 - 31 Aug 2019 12:16 AM
Massive gaps in youth development. Needs to be some research done in these areas.

I think we need to SEE the connection from

Youth leagues -> A-League & OR NT EXPOSURE -> Overseas. 

Make a name HERE -> THEN go overseas.

NOT! Nobodies , no names, then see them in the NT not knowing who the fug 

Borello and Leckie say hi
LFC.
LFC.
World Class
World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 6.6K, Visits: 0
AJF - 4 Sep 2019 2:46 PM
@miron, speaking as a current coach, the NC doesn't actually require every coach to use the dutch 433 or any system for that matter What it does is provides a "professional" coaching framework around which coaches can develop their playing philosophies and then develop training plans to achieve them. I can say without doubt that the C-license course and NC has helped improve my coaching but I do not employ the 433 nor everthing in the NC (ie I often dont play a training game at the end of training sessions as I prefer to keep working on a specific game aspect). 

The inflexibility comes from the many "non-football" people who have gotten the coaching badges are using the NC as a crutch to support their lack of knowledge and understanding of football. For example if you played AFL all your life then get your C-license so you can coach your sons team in NPL (no I am not joking there are people like this coaching kids as we speak) all you know is whats in the NC as this is what you picked up during the training so what else can you talk about.

At the top end, your comments about the HAL are spot on and the fear of losing the ball pervades most teams so you end up with thie stodgy passing backwards no risk style of play which often makes the HAL unwatchable. Unfortunately this mentality flows into the HAL academies and when good kids are picked up out of the NPL teams the HAL academies ensure all creativity is drained and keeping possession is the only goal. There are many senior NPL coaches who wont look at returning HAL academy players as they are passing robots (normally backwards) and have difficulty adapting to different styles.

One final observation, I dont particularly rate Arzani as a special player, but one thing he did do was try go forward and be creative, which is so rare in the HAL from Aussie players that people got really excited.



Good to read your doing it your way but as you mention there is some good points in the NC.....
The problem is some Coachs I've watched train my boys (not like your experience down south ie AFL background getting C lic OMG) PL3 and this is a German Coach carried out NC by the book that I could see and turned 2 potential winning squads he had over 2 seasons into park the bus robots.
Any kid with flair was frowned upon and berated @ HT for eg.
Some of these kids were potential match winners, free kicks just near the box that were chance goals was called out "play ball" so the simple pass retaining possession FFS.
A Miron, I agree have we squeezed out far too much of the ethnic game.
As AJF mentions comes down to ingraining your own philosophy so to speak - whats wrong with throwing in the good from the current NC and the good from the NSL ethnic style of play.
We saw how good the Crows did making it to the WC Final, the Dutch are doing ok again, the Italians are re grouping and looking good etcetc....
We have such a mix here as we all know re backgrounds which is great but its NC Barcelona ticka tacka, reset reset reset, all the ball in the world doesn't win you games unless you have the skill to play one touch football that we do not currently and we have weeded out individualism game breakers.
It drives me nuts watching Youth many times but at PL1/2/3 levels I'm still enjoying some good games.
FFACup game we went to Sydney United vs PL2 St George was a cracking game of good football that went to extra time and a 8 goal thriller.
Our kids need to play like that.




Barca4Life
Barca4Life
Legend
Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)Legend (10K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 10K, Visits: 0
AJF - 4 Sep 2019 2:46 PM
@miron, speaking as a current coach, the NC doesn't actually require every coach to use the dutch 433 or any system for that matter What it does is provides a "professional" coaching framework around which coaches can develop their playing philosophies and then develop training plans to achieve them. I can say without doubt that the C-license course and NC has helped improve my coaching but I do not employ the 433 nor everthing in the NC (ie I often dont play a training game at the end of training sessions as I prefer to keep working on a specific game aspect). 

The inflexibility comes from the many "non-football" people who have gotten the coaching badges are using the NC as a crutch to support their lack of knowledge and understanding of football. For example if you played AFL all your life then get your C-license so you can coach your sons team in NPL (no I am not joking there are people like this coaching kids as we speak) all you know is whats in the NC as this is what you picked up during the training so what else can you talk about.

At the top end, your comments about the HAL are spot on and the fear of losing the ball pervades most teams so you end up with thie stodgy passing backwards no risk style of play which often makes the HAL unwatchable. Unfortunately this mentality flows into the HAL academies and when good kids are picked up out of the NPL teams the HAL academies ensure all creativity is drained and keeping possession is the only goal. There are many senior NPL coaches who wont look at returning HAL academy players as they are passing robots (normally backwards) and have difficulty adapting to different styles.

One final observation, I dont particularly rate Arzani as a special player, but one thing he did do was try go forward and be creative, which is so rare in the HAL from Aussie players that people got really excited.



That’s correct, the people that follow the NC rigidly have little to no knowledge of the game and often have little time to plan a good session together.

Which is why the robot term has been bandied around, the smart ones knows it’s a just base and the rest is on them.

The robot myth needs to be busted for the types that know little about football or just don’t have the time to plan a good session together.
Edited
3 Months Ago by Barca4Life
LFC.
LFC.
World Class
World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)World Class (6.7K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 6.6K, Visits: 0
Pasquali - 4 Sep 2019 4:42 PM
highkick05 - 31 Aug 2019 12:16 AM

Borello and Leckie say hi

were "excited"......

Kamaryn
Kamaryn
Pro
Pro (3.1K reputation)Pro (3.1K reputation)Pro (3.1K reputation)Pro (3.1K reputation)Pro (3.1K reputation)Pro (3.1K reputation)Pro (3.1K reputation)Pro (3.1K reputation)Pro (3.1K reputation)Pro (3.1K reputation)Pro (3.1K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 3K, Visits: 0
Barca4Life - 4 Sep 2019 6:56 PM
AJF - 4 Sep 2019 2:46 PM

That’s correct, the people that follow the NC rigidly have little to no knowledge of the game and often have little time to plan a good session together.

Which is why the robot term has been bandied around, the smart ones knows it’s a just base and the rest is on them.

The robot myth needs to be busted for the types that know little about football or just don’t have the time to plan a good session together.

I agree. But not only is it mostly those with little football/coaching knowledge who seem to be using the NC rigidly, I also would argue that it has still potentially been good for those coaches and has them coaching at a higher standard. At least now the uneducated/inexperienced have something to guide to, rather than the "clear it" I used to always hear from the sidelines.

Replacing "clear it" types with robotic keep possession types seems like a win to me. 
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 22K, Visits: 0
Sebr1968 - 25 Aug 2019 3:28 PM
As much as I hated the way football was run in Australia in the past (especially the NSL era), one thing I will say, Australian youth football teams would regularly qualify for numerous FIFA tournaments and the Olympics, where they were very competitive. But over the last 15 or so years, the standard of our youth teams has gone to shit, where did it all go wrong?

I know in the past we had the AIS in Canberra where there was a football division, is this still around?

Since the A-League clubs have been given control of football (as we are led to believe), what plans do the A-League owners have for youth development?, eg. the setting up of youth acedemies.

In  the epoch when Australia did well in some underage tournaments, we failed to qualify for a senior World Cup for 32 years!

This underage stars didn't progress to fulfil the early promise as performers in international football. 

Their faults  were identified and a new curriculum was designed to redress those issues.

The main issue  has been not  having a viable second division  or not  enough professional clubs in Aus to provide sufficient pathways.

There was an interesting podcast  with Craig Foster and Mark Rudan, where they elucidated that many of their former  players they had developed, just could never ever get an opportunity to play HAL. Most quit, and thanked their coaches before doing  so.

They felt they had been given good coaching, but never had a genuine opportunity to showcase their skills in a professional scenario.



Edited
3 Months Ago by Decentric
Decentric
Decentric
Legend
Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)Legend (22K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 22K, Visits: 0
miron mercedes - 4 Sep 2019 1:28 PM
I am becoming more and more convinced that youth development and football in general is suffering from the stodgy one size fits all National Curriculum.
I believe it is based on the Dutch system and the 443 playing formation.
No one plays 443 at present. 
We need to modernise and show kids different and varying systems from about age ten on .
These kids are smarter than we think and can handle it.
 We also need to let kids play and "show off a bit" if they have some flair...don't coach it out of them...encourage it .

Also ....whilst we needed to get away from the "ethnic" image the old NSL had we have taken it too far .
In the NSL days you had clubs playing varying styles of football. The Croations had free flowing individuals , the Italians a bit of everything , the Dutch were different again .
Each team had varying nationalties playing and coaching . It made for some exciting football.
When you went to NSL games you got different styles depending on who your team was playing .
It was good to watch and play .

Now we have teams all playing similar styles and no one wants to break out of the mould. 
Remember when Ange dared to do it ? "Roarcelona" were born and excited the league for a few years.
We need both junior and senior clubs to be more individual and play different styles.
Our playing style is stale and predictable.
The crowds need to see players who do unexpected things ...to get that junior players have to be allowed to try things as they progress.


What the eclectic approach showed though, was little success in international football.

All powerhouses tend to have systems of play they adhere to. There is a lot of common ground in powerhouses, with Italy proving to be  the exception.

Italy tend to be the only  powerhouse deploying a different approach.



AJF
AJF
Semi-Pro
Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)Semi-Pro (1.5K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 1.4K, Visits: 0
Decentric - 4 Sep 2019 11:26 PM
miron mercedes - 4 Sep 2019 1:28 PM

What the eclectic approach showed though, was little success in international football.

All powerhouses tend to have systems of play they adhere to. There is a lot of common ground in powerhouses, with Italy proving to be  the exception.

Italy tend to be the only  powerhouse deploying a different approach.



You do realize that the vast majority of players who played in the teams that have qualified were NSL products?

Do you also realise that neither Ange nor Arnie play the 433 depicted in the NC. Plus I would challenge anyone to describe Bert van Marwijk's tactics in the last WC as meeting the NC philosophy (below for those interested):

A proactive brand of football, based on effective possession with the cutting edge provided by creative individuals.
Defensively the key components are quick transition and intelligent collective pressing.
The Playing Style is underpinned by a strong ‘team mentality’, capitalising on Australia’s traditional strengths.